John McCain, Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Marco Rubio look for primary victories

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John McCain, Marco Rubio face important primaries Tuesday

In an election cycle so far marked by insurgent, outsider success, blue chip politicians Sen. Marco Rubio, Sen. John McCain, and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz look to quell rebellions against them Tuesday.

Arizona and Florida are holding primaries, and the two Republican senators and former Democratic National Committee chairwoman are looking to turn their attention to the general election. All three are favored to win, but anti-incumbent sentiment, among other concerns, have all three politicians on guard.

SEE ALSO: Democratic congressman refuses to campaign with Hillary Clinton

​​​​​McCain, who turned 80 yesterday, has been explicitly criticized as too old by his opponent, Kelli Ward, a medical doctor.

"John McCain has fallen down on the job. He's gotten weak. He's gotten old," Ward said on MSNBC Thursday. "I want to give him the best birthday present ever: the gift of retirement."

Watch more of the interview:
McCain Senate challenger: He's 'old' & 'weak'

Rubio, the former presidential candidate, has been criticized for reneging on his promise not to run again for senate, if he lost the Republican nomination for president.

Businessman Carlos Beruff, who some say has fashioned himself in the model of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, has harshly criticized Rubio.

"Washington's candidate Marco Rubio continues to lie about me and about his record, hiding behind his Washington allies of course," Beruff said in a July press release. "It's no surprise considering integrity is clearly not an important quality to Senator Rubio, who lied to the people of Florida about amnesty, lied about his support for Donald Trump and lied about his promise to not run for reelection."

Rubio would face off against the winner of the Democratic primary – either Rep. Patrick Murphy, favored by establishment forces, or the fiery, controversial populist Rep. Alan Grayson.

Wasserman Schultz, still reeling from having to step down from running the DNC, is facing a challenge from law school professor Tim Canova, who is endorsed by Sen. Bernie Sanders. Some have criticized Sanders in recent days for failing to do more on Canova's behalf, however.

See photos of Wasserman Schultz:
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CHARLESTON, SC - JANUARY 17: U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL 23rd District) and chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) speaks to reporters in the spin room after watching tonight's democratic presidential debate at the Gaillard Center on January 17, 2016 in Charleston, South Carolina. Democratic presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley spent yesterday campaigning in South Carolina in lead up to tonight's debate. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 19: DNC Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) introduces US President Barack Obama during the Democratic National Committee's Women's Leadership Forum, September 19, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Womens Leadership Forum is holding their 21st annual National Issues Conference a the Marriot Marquis Hotel. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Former US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (R) hugs DNC Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (L), D-FL, as Clinton arrives on stage to speak at the Democratic National Committee's Womens Leadership Forum Issues Conference in Washington, DC on September 19, 2014. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 23: Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz attends a campaign rally at Florida International University Panther Arena on July 23, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine made their first public appearance together a day after the Clinton campaign announced Senator Kaine as the Democratic vice presidential candidate. (Photo by Alexander Tamargo/WireImage)
Debbie Wasserman Schultz, chairperson of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), speaks during a campaign event for Hillary Clinton, presumptive 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, not pictured, in Miami, Florida, U.S., on Saturday, July 23, 2016. Clinton named Virginia Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate for the Democratic presidential ticket, a widely-anticipated choice that may say more about how she wants to govern than how she plans to win in November. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Democratic National Committee (DNC) Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz speaks at a rally, before the arrival of Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and her vice presidential running mate U.S. Senator Tim Kaine, in Miami, Florida, U.S. July 23, 2016. Picture taken July 23, 2016. REUTERS/Scott Audette
Democratic National Committee chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz talks with members of the media before the Democratic presidential candidates debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, December 19, 2015. REUTERS/Gretchen Ertl
U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) stands with her friend Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) (R) during a farewell ceremony for Giffords on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, in this still image taken from video, January 25, 2012. Giffords, wounded a year ago in a deadly Tucson shooting spree, stepped down from the U.S. Congress on Wednesday to focus on her recovery. REUTERS/HouseTV/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS PROFILE SOCIETY)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 21: Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., descends the House steps after a vote in the Capitol, October 21 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
CHARLESTON, SC - JANUARY 17: U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL 23rd District) and chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) speaks to reporters in the spin room after watching tonight's democratic presidential debate at the Gaillard Center on January 17, 2016 in Charleston, South Carolina. Democratic presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley spent yesterday campaigning in South Carolina in lead up to tonight's debate. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
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Wasserman Schultz, on the other hand, is backed by a formidable political trifecta: President Barack Obama, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, and Vice President Joe Biden.


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