ISIS says its leader who coordinated attacks on the West has been killed

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

Who Really Created ISIS?


An ISIS-linked media agency reported Tuesday that one of the group's top-ranking lieutenants has been killed near Aleppo, Syria.

The Amaq agency released a statement declaring ISIS spokesman Abu Muhammad al-Adnani's death. ISIS followed Amaq's statement with an official statement of its own released through its online channels.

Adnani was reportedly responsible for coordinating attacks on targets in the West. He also released propaganda statements on behalf of the group.

Adnani had massive influence inside ISIS.

Click through images of the battles with ISIS and conditions in Mosul:

17 PHOTOS
Battles with ISIS and conditions in Mosul
See Gallery
Battles with ISIS and conditions in Mosul
A fighter of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) holds an ISIL flag and a weapon on a street in the city of Mosul, June 23, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer /File Photo
Kurdish Peshmerga forces sit in a military vehicle on the southeast of Mosul, Iraq, August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
A member of the Kurdish Peshmerga forces takes his position in a military vehicle on the southeast of Mosul , Iraq, August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
Kurdish Peshmerga forces ride on military vehicles on the southeast of Mosul, Iraq, August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
A fighter from the Islamic State, formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), mans an anti-aircraft gun mounted on the rear of a vehicle in Mosul July 16, 2014. The banner on the bridge reads: "Welcome to the State of Nineveh; There is no God but God and Mohammad is the Messenger of God". REUTERS/Stringer /File Photo
Kurdish Peshmerga forces gather on the southeast of Mosul, Iraq, August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
Kurdish Peshmerga forces ride on military vehicles on the southeast of Mosul, Iraq, August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
Displaced people approach the Kurdish Peshmerga forces on the southeast of Mosul, Iraq, August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
MOSUL, IRAQ - AUGUST 23 : Iraqi people who fled from their villages due to Daesh attacks are seen at the Dibege refugee camp in Mahmour region of Mosul on August 23, 2016. (Photo by Yunus Keles/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
An Iraqi man holds his national flag while civilians stand in the the street on August 24, 2016, as Iraqi forces took key position in the centre of Qayyarah, officials said, on the second day of an operation to recapture the northern town from Islamic State (IS) group jihadists. Qayyarah lies on the western bank of the Tigris river, about 60 kilometres (35 miles) south of Mosul, the Islamic State group's last major urban stronghold in Iraq. / AFP / MAHMOUD SALEH (Photo credit should read MAHMOUD SALEH/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Wednesday, March 9, 2016 file photo, Iraqi Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi, center, arrives at a military a base outside Tikrit, 130 kilometers (80 miles) north of Baghdad, Iraq. Al-Obeidi has received a no-confidence vote from parliament just as Iraqi forces retook a key northern town near the Islamic State-held city of Mosul on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. He is the first sitting defense minister to receive a no confidence vote from parliament since the overthrow of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in 2003. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban, File)
Iraqi security forces enter the town of Qayara, 70 kilometers (45 miles) south of Mosul, after defeating Islamic state group forces, northern Iraq, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Iraqi forces retook the key town of Qayara, near a major air base south of Mosul from the Islamic State group Thursday, according to a statement issued from the office of prime minister Al-Abadi. (AP Photo)
In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces take part in a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's leaders have repeatedly promised that Mosul â which has been in the hands of IS militants for more than two years now â will be retaken this year. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
Iraqi Kurdish female fighter Haseba Nauzad (2nd R), 24, and Yazidi female fighter Asema Dahir (3rd R), 21, aim their weapon during a deployment near the frontline of the fight against Islamic State militants in Nawaran near Mosul, Iraq, April 20, 2016. When Islamic State swept into the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar in 2014, a few young Yazidi women took up arms against the militants attacking women and girls from their community. The killing and enslaving of thousands from Iraq's minority Yazidi community focused international attention on the group's violent campaign to impose its radical ideology and prompted Washington to launch an air offensive. It also prompted the formation of this unusual 30-woman unit made up of Yazidis as well as Kurds from Iraq and neighbouring Syria. For them, only one thing matters: revenge for the women raped, beaten and executed by the jihadist militants. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah SEARCH "WOMEN NAWARAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Female Peshmerga fighters hold their weapons at a site during a deployment near the frontline of the fight against Islamic State militants in Nawaran near Mosul, Iraq, April 20, 2016. When Islamic State swept into the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar in 2014, a few young Yazidi women took up arms against the militants attacking women and girls from their community. The killing and enslaving of thousands from Iraq's minority Yazidi community focused international attention on the group's violent campaign to impose its radical ideology and prompted Washington to launch an air offensive. It also prompted the formation of this unusual 30-woman unit made up of Yazidis as well as Kurds from Iraq and neighbouring Syria. For them, only one thing matters: revenge for the women raped, beaten and executed by the jihadist militants. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah SEARCH "WOMEN NAWARAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Smoke rises after airstrikes from the U.S.-led coalition against Islamic State militants in a village east of Mosul, Iraq, May 29, 2016. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

And he was thought to be a potential successor to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi if Baghdadi were to be killed.

Adnani's death is a "major blow" to ISIS, according to Rita Katz, a terrorism analyst and the director of the SITE Intelligence Group.

"When calling for lone wolf attacks in [the] West, ISIS fighters/supporters quote Adnani more than any other individual," Katz said on Twitter.

The Bastille Day attack in Nice, France — during which a man killed more than 80 people after he drove a truck into a crowd — seemed possibly inspired by an Adnani statement from 2014 that called on supporters to kill "infidels" wherever they can.

"If you are not able to find an IED or a bullet, then single out the disbelieving American, Frenchman, or any of their allies," Adnani said. "Smash his head with a rock, or slaughter him with a knife, or run him over with your car, or throw him down from a high place, or choke him, or poison him."

In an in-depth report published earlier this month, The New York Times described Adnani's role within ISIS. Aside from being the group's spokesman, he reportedly oversaw a complex and extensive network of secret operatives dispatched to Europe to conduct attacks on targets in the West.

Adnani, who was born in Syria, had been with ISIS since its earliest days. He went to Syria on behalf of the group in 2012, before ISIS seized territory across the Middle East and declared its "caliphate."

Official channels have so far not confirmed the death, but terrorism experts have stated that the statement from Amaq appears legitimate.

Read Full Story

People are Reading