Los Angeles police say reports of gunfire at airport were false alarm

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Police: reports of gunfire at LA airport were false alarm

Aug 28 (Reuters) - Terminals at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) were evacuated briefly late on Sunday after reports of gunfire that police later determined were incorrect, in the second recent false alarm at a major U.S. airport.

At least two terminals were closed while security personnel checked them for anything suspicious, according to Officer Alicia Hernandez of the Los Angeles Police Department.

The central terminal's arrival and departures areas as well as all other terminals re-opened after about two hours.

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In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration officer candidate passes through a body scanner as she plays the part of an air traveler during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Hans Phifer works with Rufus, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
This Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo shows an etching of a bomb-sniffing dog on the glass door at the entrance to the Transportation Security Administration canine training facilityat Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, searches a mail cart in a makeshift warehouse during a Transportation Security Administration training drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration instructor Larry Colburn covers his ears as he prepares to set off an explosive device during a lecture to airport security officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration instructor watches candidates train on a baggage X-ray machine during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Tref, a bomb-sniffing dog, goes through drills in a makeshift airport at a Transportation Security Administration training facility at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidates practice pat-down techniques during a training session in airport security checkpoint procedures at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
This Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo shows explosive compounds on display for Transportation Security Administration candidates during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration airport security officer candidates listen during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
This Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, shows an explosive trigger on display for Transportation Security Administration candidates during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Mitchell Brown works with Atilla, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area at Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Bella, a bomb-sniffing dog, wears a "Do Not Pet" harness as she goes through drills in a makeshift airport during drills at Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Mitchell Brown works with Atilla, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area at Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration trainer Anthony Martinez works with Bella, a bomb-sniffing dog, during drills in a makeshift airport at a Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Anthony Martinez works with Bella, a bomb-sniffing dog, during drills in a makeshift airport at a Lackland Air Force Base training facility in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Atilla, a bomb-sniffing dog, is rewarded with a tennis ball as she trains with Transportation Security Administration's Mitchell Brown in a makeshift luggage area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Melissa Ellis works with Toska, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Hans Phifer works with Rufus, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift luggage area during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Thursday, June 9, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration dog trainer Ford Rinewalt works with Sylvia, a bomb-sniffing dog, in a makeshift warehouse during a drill at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Short-staffed and stung by a report showing banned items slipping through security, the TSA is training new agents and canine teams to do a better job.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidate Mark Holm role plays as a passenger during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration instructor Larry Colburn gives an explosives lecture to airport security officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration instructor holds an explosives trigger during an explosives lecture to airport security officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidate Shasta Terry gets help from instructor Frank Crane as she learns to scan bags during an airport security training session at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration officer candidate Crystal Champagne scans baggage during a training session in an airport security checkpoint simulator at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration security officer candidates attend an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration airport security officer candidates listen during an explosives lecture at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration security officer candidates cover their ears as an explosive device is detonated on a bomb range during an explosives demonstration at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, an explosive device is detonated on a bomb range during an explosives demonstration for Transportation Security Administration candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Wednesday, June 8, 2016, photo, a Transportation Security Administration candidate learns to operate a body scanner during a training session at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, Transportation Security Administration instructor Larry Colburn gives an explosives lecture to airport security candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
In this Tuesday, June 7, 2016, photo, a bomb is detonated on a range during an explosives demonstration for Transportation Security Administration officer candidates at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. Short-staffed and often criticized, the TSA aims to improve training for airport screeners. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
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An investigation was under way, Andy Neiman, head of media relations for the LAPD, said in a Twitter message.

The alert came two months after police temporarily evacuated a terminal at New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport while they investigated reports of gunfire there, also later determined to be false.

A preliminary investigation of that incident, which also occurred on a Sunday evening, found no evidence of foul play or suspicious activity.

U.S. airport security officials have been on heightened alert in recent months following deadly attacks at international airports in Belgium and Turkey.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said on its website that air traffic to LAX was being delayed at the point of departure.

Airport authorities said in a Twitter post that an individual in a Zorro costume had been detained there, without indicating whether that incident was connected to Sunday night's scare.

(Reporting by Chris Michaud; Editing by Paul Tait and John Stonestreet)

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