The U.S. is about to welcome 10,000th Syrian refugee

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U.S. Will Hit Goal Of Admitting 10,000 Syrian Refugees

The U.S. is about to welcome its 10,000th Syrian refugee as part of a resettlement program, U.S. ambassador to Jordan, Alice Wells, announced on Sunday.

The U.S. had planned to resettle a total of 10,000 Syrians this fiscal year, and that target will be hit on Monday, Wells said, the Associated Press reported.

10,000 accounts for just a small percentage of the total number of registered Syrian refugees—more than 4.8 million across countries including Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, and North Africa, according to UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency. More than 8 million others are expected to be displaced inside of Syria in 2016, UNHCR says.

Click through images of Syrian refugees hoping to migrate:

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In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee boys herd sheep near a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, Syrians line up to apply for visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh, north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum -- a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, Syrians line up to apply for visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh, north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum -- a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, Syrian Abdul-Razzak al-Dabi, 40, who wants to move to Germany where he can treat his two disabled sons, displays medical reports, as he waits with other Syrians who are lining up to apply for visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh north of Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying for visas are seeking asylum -- a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015, photo, a Syrian boy sits in a wheelchair as he lines up with his family to apply for an asylum visa, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh, north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum -- a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, a Syrian man, right, Andreh Abdul-Nour, 19, who lost his right leg in a mortar attack in the northern city of Aleppo last December, waits with other Syrians, who line up to apply for visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh, north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum -- a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee Rim Obeid, 26, hangs laundry at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
n this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, a Lebanese policeman stands guard as Syrian citizens line up to apply for visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh, north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum - a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee Rim Hilal, 25, reacts during an interview with The Associated Press inside her tent at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee Mohammed Adnan, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press inside his tent at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, a Syrian refugee covered with a cloth sleeps inside his family's tent, at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee boys watch television inside their family's tent at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee Ibrahim Mahmoud speaks during an interview with The Associated Press surrounded by his children inside his tent at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee Abdelkrim Mahmoud sleeps on a hammock hung in a tent at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The unending misery of the around 4 million Syrian refugees scattered around Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and other Arab nations is one significant factor in the rise of those willing to risk the dangerous sea crossing and exhausting land trek to Europe. With the Syrian civil war in its fifth year, they have little hope of returning home, and for many the situation in exile is worsening. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, Syrian citizens line up to apply for visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum -- a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Friday, Sept. 11, 2015 photo, a Syrian man holds his family's passports as he lines up with other Syrians to apply for asylum visas, outside the German embassy, in Rabieh, north Beirut, Lebanon. Many of those applying are seeking asylum - a process that could take months. Lebanon hosts more than 1.1 million Syrian refugees or a quarter of the country's entire population while Jordan hosts about 630,000 Syrian refugees, who now make up about 10 percent of the country's population. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, Syrian refugee Ghazi Helal, 28, right, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press as his wife Rim, 25, and 17-month-old son Mohammed sit next to him inside their tent at a Syrian refugee camp in the town of Deir Zanoun, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. The Helal family is willing to risk the arduous, dangerous journey to Europe, but, among the poorest of the Syrian refugees across the region, the family can’t afford to pay a smuggler. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)
?In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Amena Abomosa, 43, a single mother, ?shows the documents for her successful application for direct resettlement in France, in Amman, Jordan. The family fled Damascus Syria for Jordan after Abomosa’s husband was killed by a sniper as he tried to save a wounded child. A single mother with three kids supporting a grandmother with cancer, Abomosa is headed to France on Monday, Sept. 15, 2015, a rare recipient of legal migration. Abomosa was able to prove her hardship and need for asylum because she carried with her from Syria a trove of documents detailing her struggle. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
?In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Amena Abomosa, 43, center, poses for a photo with her daughters Isra,18, left, and Reemaz, 17, at their family home in Amman, Jordan. The family fled Damascus, Syria for Jordan after Abomosa’s husband was killed by a sniper while trying to save a wounded child. A single mother with three kids supporting a grandmother with cancer, Abomosa is headed to France on Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, a rare recipient of legal migration papers. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Amena Abomosa, 43, holds the passports of her five-person household containing visas to allow them to resettle as refugees in France,in Amman Jordan. The family fled Damascus, Syria for Jordan after Abomosa’s husband was killed by a sniper while trying to save a wounded child. A single mother with three kids supporting a grandmother with cancer, Abomosa is headed to France on Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, a rare recipient of legal migration. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 photo, Amena Abomosa's "widow of a martyr" certificate issued by the Syrian Institution for Documenting and Publishing lays next to two portraits of her 62-year-old mother, Hana, and other documents, in Amman, Jordan. A year after her husband, Abdul Arrzaq Adnan Khalil Mardini, 48, was killed by a sniper in Damascus in July 2012, Abomosa fled Syria for Jordan with her three kids supporting a mother with cancer. On Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, Abomosa is headed to France, a rare recipient of legal migration. ????????????????(AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
In this Monday, Sept. 7, 2015 photo, Syria's top diplomat in Jordan, Ayman Alloush, looks over documents for the passport application of a Syrian refugee outside the Syrian embassy in Amman, Jordan. Criticizing the international and regional failure to address Syrian’s plight within the Middle East, Alloush, said he was directing staff to work overtime to issue the travel documents regardless of the applicant's sect. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil)
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The resettlement program, which focuses on refugees who are the most vulnerable, started off slowly before picking up pace by early this month, NPR reported. The U.S. is among other Western nations including Canada that have taken in Syrian refugees since conflict started in the country in 2011.

Speaking in Jordan on Sunday, Wells said that refugees are traveling to the U.S. on Sunday and Monday, and "soon they will land in the United States to start their new lives." She said she wanted to be clear that meeting the goal of resettling 10,000 refugees "did not come at the cost of our comprehensive and robust security measures."

The comment seemed to be aimed at quelling concerns that accepting refugees could lead to security threats inside the United States. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has spoken out against letting refugees in, saying doing so could allow terrorists to enter the country.

"Refugees are the most thoroughly screened category of travelers to the United States," Wells said on Sunday.

The post The U.S. Is About To Welcome 10,000th Syrian Refugee appeared first on Vocativ.

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