Hurricane Gaston reforms in Atlantic Ocean

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Tropical Systems Threaten to Bring Heavy Rain to Florida, Gulf Coast

A storm churning in the Atlantic Ocean strengthened into a hurricane on Saturday as a separate system threatened to dump rain on Florida, sparking fears about standing water amid a battle against Zika virus.

Hurricane Gaston was around 655 miles east-southeast of Bermuda and was moving northwest at 8 mph as of 11 p.m., the National Hurricane Center said. It had maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. The hurricane had previously weakened to a tropical storm before regaining strength Saturday.

Forecasters expect the hurricane to slow down and swing north by Monday, and there are no warnings issued for land. The storm could strengthen Sunday or Monday, the hurricane center said.

Meanwhile, a storm system in the Caribbean was producing showers and storms in Cuba but could bring rain to Florida — something that could cause standing water to collect and add a challenge to the state's efforts to combat the mosquito-borne Zika virus, officials said.

RELATED: Singapore confirms first case of locally transmitted Zika virus

The low pressure system could bring rain to southern Florida and the Florida Keys by Sunday, forecasters said.

The system was large but disorganized Saturday night, but it has a 40 percent chance of turning into a tropical cyclone over the next 48 hours, the hurricane center said. A tropical cyclone doesn't necessarily mean a destructive storm like a hurricane, but just a rotating organized system.

"As this system moves into the Gulf of Mexico it will have a greater potential to organize, so it still poses a significant risk, and we are urging everyone to remain vigilant and to prepare for this possible scenario," Florida Department of Emergency Management Director Bryan Koon said in a statement.

Florida officials urged residents to dump any water that collects. Florida has confirmed nearly 600 infections of Zika, a virus that can cause severe birth defects when pregnant women are infected — including microcephaly, a condition where the head is unusually small.

SEE MORE: New images show devastating impact of Zika on babies' brains

The vast majority of those cases are related to travel to countries experiencing Zika transmission, areas that include much of Latin America and the Caribbean.

But more than 40 cases of locally transmitted Zika have been confirmed in Florida, and there have been outbreaks in an area of Miami and Miami Beach. On Tuesday, a case was reported on Florida's Gulf coast.

Scroll through to see how Zika is spreading in Miami:

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Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county
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Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel peers into a drain in Miami's Wynwood district to detect any mosquito presence on Saturday, July 30, 2016. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel stops to write in her log on Northwest 28th Street in Miami's Wynwood district on Saturday, July 30, 2016. On foot and in her truck, Nagel covered a swath of the district to combat any mosquito presence. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Diana Ozuna, with her 20-month-old daughter Lianah, lives in Miami's Wynwood district -- an area in which the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes. On Saturday, July 30, 2016, Ozuna talks about the threat of the virus. She says she takes the threat seriously and applies protective spray on her and her daughter. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel drops a chemical tablet into a drain that shows signs of mosquitos in Miami's Wynwood district on Saturday, July 30, 2016. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, prepares to use a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, prepares to use a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, uses a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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