Endangered wolf pack to be killed after cows found dead

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Washington State To Kill Endangered Wolf Pack After Cows Found Dead

An entire pack of endangered wolves in Washington was approved for elimination after it was linked to ongoing attacks on cows, notes NBCNews.

A press release issued by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife last week reveals that the authorization applies to the Profanity Peak wolf pack which is believed to consist of at least five pups and six adults.

In mid-July the animals were found to be responsible for the deaths or injuries of at least six cows.

Consequently, the wildlife officials were given the go ahead to kill limited members of the pack.

Click through for photos of wolf packs:

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A wolf plays with a one-month-old puppy in its enclosure of Berlin's Zoo on May 31, 2013 in Berlin. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
Two one-month-old puppies play in their enclosure of Berlin's Zoo on May 31, 2013 in Berlin. AFP PHOTO / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
** ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, AUG. 6 ** In this 2003 photo released by Wolf Park, shown is a wolf-dog hybrid in Indiana. Sandra Piovesan of Salem, Pa., who kept nine wolf-dog hybrids as pets, was found fatally mauled by the animals on July 17, 2006. Hybrids' wild instincts and often murky breeding make them a greater risk than many people realize, according to those familiar with the animal. (AP Photo/Wolf Park, Monty Sloan)
TODAY -- Pictured: An American Grey wolf appears on NBC News' 'Today' show -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo is a gray wolf at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. A group of humane societies Friday, April 12, 2013, appealed a Dane County, Wis., judge's ruling that wolf hunters can use dogs, extending their fight to erase one of the most polarizing elements of Wisconsin's wolf season. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, file)
FILE - This undated image provided by Yellowstone National Park, Mont., shows a gray wolf in the wild inside the park. Montana wildlife regulators have given their initial approval to wolf-trapping rules meant to reduce the chances of other animals, such as dogs and lynx, being caught. (AP Photo/National Park Service, MacNeil Lyons, file)
** ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY, AUG. 6 ** In this 2003 photo released by Wolf Park, shown is a wolf-dog hybrid in Indiana. Sandra Piovesan of Salem, Pa., who kept nine wolf-dog hybrids as pets, was found fatally mauled by the animals on July 17, 2006. Hybrids' wild instincts and often murky breeding make them a greater risk than many people realize, according to those familiar with the animal. (AP Photo/Wolf Park, Monty Sloan)
FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo is a gray wolf at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. A Wisconsin judge is to decide Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, whether to issue an injunction blocking wolf hunts while he weighs a lawsuit filed by a coalition of humane societies. They allege the DNR failed to set up restrictions on the use of dogs, creating the potential for bloody wolf-dog fights in the woods. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, file)
Wolf pups play at the Mission Wolf refuge near Westcliff, Colo., in this Jan. 1997, photo. Looks can be deceiving when it comes to wolf dogs, hybrid canines that are part wolf and part dog, experts say. (AP Photo/Tracy Brooks)
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The release explained that as part of the directive, the officials "...shot two pack members [on] Aug. 5, but announced an end to wolf-removal efforts after two weeks passed without finding any more evidence of wolf predation on cattle."

However, since that time, three calves have been found dead or injured so the removal operation has been expanded and reinstated.

While some lawmakers and conservationists have expressed concern over the killing of these endangered animals, fish and wildlife officials say they "have a shared responsibility to protect livestock from repeated depredation by wolves."

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