The history of the Internet in less than 2 minutes

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The history of the Internet in less than 2 minutes

We use the Internet every day. You're on the Internet right now.

But the Internet was only available to a handful of people until August 23, 1991: when computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee created the World Wide Web.

Let's look back at our relationship with the Internet.

1991
The U.S. government opens the Internet to commercial use, before then the Internet was mainly used by scientists and the military.

1992
The very first photo is posted on the Internet. It's an image of an all-female parody pop group called Les Horribles Cernettes.

SEE ALSO:8 things you didn't know about Harry Potter

1994
The first online purchase is made. It's widely disputed whether it is a large pepperoni, mushroom pizza with extra cheese, a Sting album, groceries, or bag of weed.

1995
The dot-com boom begins as investors pour millions of dollars into startup Internet companies.

Poor planning leads to a dot-com crash and many of these companies disappear in the early 2000s.

But not all of them. Internet Explorer, Amazon, Yahoo!, and eBay all hit the web in '95.

1996
For the first time, e-mail is sent more than snail mail in the U.S.

In the same year, Google is founded and Microsoft's Bill Gates becomes the richest person in the world.

2000
Finally, more than half of American households have Internet access.

2004
Gmail is released on April Fools' Day and is widely believed to be a joke.

The same year, Mark Zuckerberg launches Facebook as Thefacebook.

2005
The first video is uploaded to YouTube. It's 18 seconds long and called "Me at the zoo".

2006
The first tweet was is written when Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey tweeted: "just setting up my twttr".

2009
Michael Jackson passes away.

The news causes many of the biggest websites on the Internet to crash. Google blocks on all searches relating to Michael Jackson for 30 minutes, believing it is under a cyber attack.

2010
The first Instagram photo is posted. It features the CEO's golden retriever and his girlfriend's foot.

2013
"What is twerking?" is 2013's most popular question beginning with "What is".

2016
Apple releases a message to its customers about the U.S. government demanding Apple to help break encryption and bypass iPhone security features.

Click through the gallery below to see Internet cafes around the world:

13 PHOTOS
internet cafes around the world
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internet cafes around the world
TO GO WITH AFP BY HABIBOU BANGRE Clients surf the internet at an internet cafe on February 25, 2015 in Kinshasa. Sales are down and business is slow -- small entrepreneurs in the Democratic Republic of Congo are bearing the brunt of an official clampdown on mobile Internet services and text messages. Internet operators remain powerless in the face of complaints from customers and have yet to communicate the extent of their losses caused by the restrictions. People, however, have found various ways of bypassing the restrictions although it has meant shelling out more. AFP PHOTO/FEDERICO SCOPPA (Photo credit should read FEDERICO SCOPPA/AFP/Getty Images)
People use computers at an Internet cafe in Manila on March 17, 2014. The Philippines said on March 17 it would require Internet service providers to install filters to block access to child pornography. AFP PHOTO / Jay DIRECTO (Photo credit should read JAY DIRECTO/AFP/Getty Images)
In this photo taken Thursday, June 5, 2014, Khue Vang, left, is questioned by a Sacramento County deputy sheriff during a code enforcement raid on the Silk and Stars in Sacramento, Calif. The operators of the Silk and Stars say they provide patrons with computers and Internet access, including computerized versions of what they call "sweepstakes games." But law enforcement considers it to be illegal gambling. The rise of the so-called Internet sweepstakes cafes has prompted Assemblyman Rudy Salas, D-Bakersfield, to introduced AB1439 that would prohibit businesses whose customers use video monitors that simulate those found in casinos or play gambling-themed games in exchange for cash or prizes.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Iranians surf the Internet at a cafe in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, Sept, 17, 2013. The joy of Iran's Facebook and Twitter fans was short-lived as authorities on Tuesday restored blocks on social networks after filters were lifted for several hours overnight. The brief access was a "technical glitch" that was quickly rectified, according to communications official Abdolsamad Khoramabadi, from the board overseeing Internet in Iran. The name of the cafe, Mehrnia Internet Cafe, is written on the window.(AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
An Iranian man surfs the Internet at a cafe in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, Sept, 17, 2013. The joy of Iran's Facebook and Twitter fans was short-lived as authorities on Tuesday restored blocks on social networks after filters were lifted for several hours overnight. The brief access was a "technical glitch" that was quickly rectified, according to communications official Abdolsamad Khoramabadi, from the board overseeing Internet in Iran.(AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
A computer user sits near displays with a message from the Chinese police on the proper use of the internet at an internet cafe in Beijing, China, Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. Many famous Chinese - from pop stars to scholars, journalists to business tycoons - have amassed substantial online followings, and these larger-than-life personalities don’t always hew to the Communist Party line. Now Beijing is tightening its grip on China’s already heavily restricted Internet by making influential microbloggers uncomfortable when they post material the government doesn’t like. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
In this June 19, 2013 photo, Indonesian children surf the net at and play games an internet cafe in Jakarta, Indonesia. The use of social networking to groom potential attackers is posing a new challenge to authorities in the world's most populous Muslim country that has been struggling to eradicate militant groups. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
In this photo taken Wednesday, March 27, 2013, a patron uses a computer at Goodtimes Internet Cafe in Louisburg, N.C. North Carolina’s legislature and courts have repeatedly said sweepstakes cafes are illegal, yet hundreds across the state remain open. State law enforcement agencies, including NCALE and the SBI, appear unwilling to move in and shut down the cafes. Meanwhile, a handful of local sheriffs and DAs are taking action on their own. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
In this Friday, Oct. 19, 2012 photo, Indonesian students browse at an internet cafe in Jakarta, Indonesia. There are growing numbers of incidents involving internet social media networks being used as a mean for children trafficking in Indonesia, at least eight reported this month alone of young girls being abducted and enslaved by men who approached them randomly on Facebook, raising concerns that the overall number of trafficked children remains grossly underestimated in the sprawling archipelago of 240 million. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
An Indian man surfs a Google page at an internet cafe in Hyderabad, India, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. For the first time, Indian prosecutors are taking Google, Yahoo, Facebook and other networking sites to court for refusing to remove material considered insulting to Indian leaders and major religious figures. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
A view of the Banadir Internet cafe in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Sunday, Dec. 26, 2010. Dutch authorities searched the shop after police arrested 12 Somali men in the key port city of Rotterdam on suspicion of preparing a terrorist attack, the public prosecutor said. The men, aged 19 to 48, were detained Friday on a tip from the intelligence services that they were planning an attack shortly in the Netherlands. There was no immediate information on the alleged target, but Rotterdam is Europe's biggest port and a hub of maritime commerce, with huge oil and gas storage facilities and dozens of massive docks. (AP Photo/Bas Czerwinski) .
In this photo taken Friday Oct. 14, 2011, a man uses a public computer at an Internet cafe where money transfer services are also available in Barcelona, Spain. According to the Center for International Studies and Documentation of Barcelona (CIDOB), immigrants are contributing to the recovery of the economy because they adapt themselves to the crisis situation better than many Spaniards, as they accept jobs they are overqualified for and are willing to relocate. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
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