Former head of FEMA slams Obama's 'botched' response to Louisiana floods

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Louisiana Newspaper Demands Obama End His Vacation

Michael Brown, the former head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is speaking out against President Obama's response to the flooding in Louisiana, criticizing the sitting president for not calling off his vacation to visit Louisiana before now.

"He could have gone to Lilly Armstrong Airport in New Orleans and made a statement there, or at the very least, what he should have done," Brown, who was largely criticized when he was director of FEMA in 2005 over the response to Hurricane Katrina, said, according to Washington Examiner. "The president needs to make sure that the entire Cabinet, that all of the departments and agencies of the federal government, know that if the FEMA director asks for anything, by damn, give it to him..."

RELATED: Louisiana disasters assistance funding

See Also: Protests erupt after Louisiana police officer fatally shoot black man outside convenience store

The flooding in Louisiana has already claimed the lives of thirteen people as over 70,000 people have registered for individual assistance. While about 9,000 people have filed flood insurance claims, the federal government has also been criticized for telling residents in the area that they did not need flood insurance, meaning many people are being denied assistance because they do not have insurance despite being told that it was not necessary.

RELATED: See the devastation in Louisiana

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Devastating scenes from Louisiana of flooding
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Devastating scenes from Louisiana of flooding
Army National Guard vehicles travel through floodwaters, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016, on LA-442, west of Tickfaw, La., as rescue operations continue after heavy rains inundated the region. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
In this aerial photo a boat motors between flooded homes after heavy rains inundating the region Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016, in Hammond, La. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards says more than 1,000 people in south Louisiana have been rescued from homes, vehicles and even clinging to trees as a slow-moving storm hammers the state with flooding. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Danielle Blount kisses her 3-month-old baby Ember as she feeds her while they wait to be evacuated by members of the Louisiana Army National Guard near Walker, La., after heavy rains inundating the region, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Motorists on Highway 190 drive through deep water through Holden, La., after heavy rains inundated the region, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said Sunday that at least 7,000 people have been rescued so far. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
An abandoned vehicle is surrounded by water on Highway 190 near Holden, La., after heavy rains inundated the region, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said Sunday that at least 7,000 people have been rescued so far. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
In this aerial photo over Amite, La., flooded homes are seen from heavy rains inundating the region, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
In this aerial photo over Amite, La., flooded homes are seen from heavy rains inundating the region, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
People arrive an area, to be evacuated by members of the Louisiana Army National Guard near Walker, La., after heavy rains inundated the region, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
In this aerial photo over Amite, La., flooded homes are seen from heavy rains inundating the region, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
In this aerial photo over Hammond, La., flooded homes are seen off of LA-1064 after heavy rains inundated the region, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
In this aerial photo over Hammond, La., cattle can bee seen huddled together in flood water after heavy rains inundated the region, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Jeff Robinson lowers a ladder from a Louisiana National Guard truck as his wife wades through flood waters from the Natalbany River near their home in Baptist, La., Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. Robinson was seeking a boat ride from state wildlife agents to pick up his wife and children when the National Guard truck arrived. A slow-moving storm that has dumped almost a foot of rain in Louisiana parishes south and west and Mississippi counties north of the Mississippi-Louisiana state line, are in for more rain. National Guard soldiers and other officials in boats and helicopters plucked more than 1,000 people from their homes and cars as "unprecedented, historic" flooding swamped Louisiana, the governor said Saturday. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans rescues three people from a rooftop due to flooding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S., A in this still image from video taken on August 13, 2016. Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans rescues three people from a rooftop due to flooding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S., in this still image from video taken on August 13, 2016. Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY
A truck drives through a flooded street in Greenwell Springs, Louisiana, U.S., August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jeffrey Dubinsky
Residents survey flooding on Lee Street after heavy rains in Sorrento, Louisiana, U.S. August 17, 2016. REUTERS/Edmund D. Fountain
A flooded house is seen in Prairieville, Louisiana, U.S., August 16, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
A casket is seen in front of a partially submerged church in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
A submerged vehicle is seen in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
A submerged house is seen in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Richard Rossi and his 4 year old great grandson Justice wade through water in search of higher ground after their home took in water in St. Amant, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Residents are rescued in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Brittany Addox carries her dog, Maggie, after being rescued in Ascension Parish, Louisiana, U.S., August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
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The president has declared a state of emergency for Louisiana and has announced plans to visit on Tuesday.

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