FOX News reporter at center of mysteriously edited State Department video says saga still 'not over'

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State Department Says Iran Nuclear Deal Video Missing A Portion



The FOX News reporter who first noticed that the State Department had edited a key section from a 2013 briefing video about the Iran nuclear deal said he is still searching for answers about why the edit was made.

"It's not over," FOX News chief Washington correspondent James Rosen told Business Insider in an interview late last week. "There's really a lot of unanswered questions that remain here."

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The State Department on Thursday released findings from a months-long investigation in which 34 people were interviewed. While the agency said the edit from the video was deliberately made, the investigation was unable to conclude who was responsible.

"I think the central answers remain elusive and will be further pursued," Rosen said. "Who ordered the edits made? Why? When? For what reasons? And what consequences should befall that person? Those are the central questions."

The 2013 video in question showed agency spokeswoman Jen Psaki appearing to admit that the press was deliberately misled about an aspect of the Iran nuclear deal.

The State Department investigation found that the video of Psaki's remarks were likely edited in the immediate aftermath of the 2013 news conference. A technician remembered receiving a call requesting the edit, but the employee claimed the passage of time had made it impossible to recall who gave the order, said the report, which was obtained by Business Insider.

"The bottom line is ... [the investigation] was inconclusive," State Department spokesman John Kirby told reporters at a press briefing.

Rosen said he was not satisfied with the report's conclusions and expected it to be examined more closely in the coming days and weeks.

"I think the report will be very closely scrutinized and I think that there will be further questions raised by both the news media and the Congress in this," he said. "And of course the Congress has powers to be brought to bear in investigation in an episode like this that the news media do not."

In June, the House Oversight Committee demanded the State Department provide documents to show why the portion of the 2013 video was mysteriously deleted.

Rosen, who had his movements tracked and was named by the administration as a "co-conspirator" over possible classified leaks in 2013, called himself a "walking embodiment" of President Barack Obama's failure to be assemble the most transparent administration in US history. He said the briefing video fiasco was just another example of that alleged failure.

See photos of Iranians react to the nuclear deal:

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Iranians react to the nuclear deal
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Iranians react to the nuclear deal
Iranians celebrate following a landmark nuclear deal in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Overcoming decades of hostility, Iran, the United States, and five other world powers struck a historic accord Tuesday to check Tehran's nuclear efforts short of building a bomb. The agreement could give Iran access to billions in frozen assets and oil revenue, stave off more U.S. military action in the Middle East and reshape the tumultuous region. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
An Iranian woman holds up an Iranian flag as people celebrate a landmark nuclear deal, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Overcoming decades of hostility, Iran, the United States, and five other world powers struck a historic accord Tuesday to check Tehran's nuclear efforts short of building a bomb. The agreement could give Iran access to billions in frozen assets and oil revenue, stave off more U.S. military action in the Middle East and reshape the tumultuous region. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
Iranians gather in celebration in northern Tehran on July 14, 2015, after Iran's nuclear negotiating team struck a deal with world powers in Vienna. Iranians poured onto the streets of Tehran after the Ramadan fast ended at sundown Tuesday to celebrate the historic nuclear deal agreed earlier with world powers in Vienna. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
Iranian women flash the v sign for victory during celebration in northern Tehran on July 14, 2015, after Iran's nuclear negotiating team struck a deal with world powers in Vienna. Iranians poured onto the streets of Tehran after the Ramadan fast ended at sundown Tuesday to celebrate the historic nuclear deal agreed earlier with world powers in Vienna. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
Iranian women take part in street celebrations following a landmark nuclear deal, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. Overcoming decades of hostility, Iran, the United States, and five other world powers struck a historic accord Tuesday to check Tehran's nuclear efforts short of building a bomb. The agreement could give Iran access to billions in frozen assets and oil revenue, stave off more U.S. military action in the Middle East and reshape the tumultuous region. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
Iranians celebrate in northern Tehran, on July 14, 2015, after Iran's nuclear negotiating team struck a deal with world powers in Vienna. Iranians poured onto the streets of Tehran after the Ramadan fast ended at sundown to celebrate the historic nuclear deal agreed earlier with world powers in Vienna. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
An Iranian man flashes the victory sign as an other holds the Iranian national flag during celebration in northern Tehran on July 14, 2015,after Iran's nuclear negotiating team struck a deal with world powers in Vienna. Major powers clinched a historic deal Tuesday aimed at ensuring Iran does not obtain the nuclear bomb, opening up Tehran's stricken economy and potentially ending decades of bad blood with the West. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
Iranians celebrate in northern Tehran, on July 14, 2015, after Iran's nuclear negotiating team struck a deal with world powers in Vienna. Iranians poured onto the streets of Tehran after the Ramadan fast ended at sundown to celebrate the historic nuclear deal agreed earlier with world powers in Vienna. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
Jubilant Iranians sing and wave Iran flags during street celebrations following a landmark nuclear deal, in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, July 14, 2015. After long, fractious negotiations, world powers and Iran struck an historic deal Tuesday to curb Iran's nuclear program in exchange for billions of dollars in relief from international sanctions - an agreement aimed at averting the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran and another U.S. military intervention in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
An Iranian man flashes the victory sign qnd holds the portrait of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani during celebration in northern Tehran on July 14, 2015,during celebration in northern Tehran on July 14, 2015,after Iran's nuclear negotiating team struck a deal with world powers in Vienna. Major powers clinched a historic deal Tuesday aimed at ensuring Iran does not obtain the nuclear bomb, opening up Tehran's stricken economy and potentially ending decades of bad blood with the West. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENARE (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
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