A New York Times investigation found that Donald Trump's US business empire holds at least $650 million in debt

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A New York Times investigation into Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's US real-estate holdings revealed that companies he owns have at least $650 million in debt — twice the amount that Trump's public filings, made as part of his campaign, show.

Trump's dealings also depend on a variety of sources, one of which he has repeatedly attacked during his campaign: China, The Times found.

Aside from revealing more information about Trump's complex business web, the investigation also shed light on how much remains "shrouded in mystery," according to The Times, as well as the potential shortcomings of the Federal Election Commission's (FEC) financial-disclosure form for candidates.

Click through images of Trump, Pence hand out supplies to residents in flood-stricken La.:

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Trump, Pence hand out supplies to residents in flood-stricken La.
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Trump, Pence hand out supplies to residents in flood-stricken La.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, right, help to unload supplies for flood victims during a tour of the flood damaged area in Gonzales, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, third from right, and his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, second from right, meet with emergency responders at a mobile command center during a tour of the flood damaged area in Gonzales, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, right, help to unload supplies for flood victims during a tour of the flood damaged area in Gonzales, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, followed by his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, shakes hands with Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry as he is greeted by Louisiana officials upon his arrival at the Baton Rouge airport in Baton Rouge, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
A sign placed by resident Doug Ford welcomes Republican Presidential candadate Donald Trump on Friday, Aug. 19, 2016 in St. Amant, La. Casting his campaign chairman aside with just 11 weeks until Election Day, Trump moved ahead with the reboot of his White House bid on Friday with a tour of flood-ravaged Louisiana. Ford 's trailer was completely flooded. (AP Photo/Rebecca Santana)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, center, and his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, listens to flood victims Jimmy and Olive Gordan during a tour of their flood damaged home in Denham Springs, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
The motorcade for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump passes a flood barrier keeping water off the highway as he travels through Gonzales, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks while touring the grounds of the Greenwell Springs Baptist Church in Greenwell Springs, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, where they are distributing food and supplies to victims of the flood. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tours the grounds of the Greenwell Springs Baptist Church in Greenwell Springs, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, where they are distributing food and supplies to victims of the flood. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
The motorcade of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump passes piles of rubbish on the side of the road in East Baton Rouge, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, center, and his running mate, Indiana Gov. Gov. Mike Pence, right, meet with flood victims during a tour of flood damaged homes in Denham Springs, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, followed by running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, emerges from his plane as he arrives to tour the flood damaged city of Baton Rouge, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tours the grounds of the Greenwell Springs Baptist Church in Greenwell Springs, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016, where they are distributing food and supplies to victims of the flood. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves before before boarding his plane prior to departing Baton Rouge, La., Friday, Aug. 19, 2016 after a tour of the flood damaged region. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
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Among the specifics, The Times reports that:

  • An office building in Manhattan, which Trump partly owns, carries a $950 million loan, partially overseen by the Bank of China, one of the largest in the country.
  • A "substantial portion" of Trump's wealth stems from three partnerships that owe another $2 billion. While Trump may not be held personally liable if the loans went into default, the value of his investments would drop.
  • In 2015, Trump borrowed $160 million from Ladder Capital, a small New York firm, which his financial-disclosure form simply lists as valued at more than $50 million.
  • The publication found three instances where Trump had ownership interest in a building but did not disclose the related debt. Of these investments, one again involves a partial loan from the Bank of China.

While the full terms of Trump's partnerships remain unknown, loans connected with them reach $1.95 billion, according to various public documents cited by The Times. Allen Weisselberg, however, told The Times that neither Trump nor the company were responsible for these debts.

The Times notes that the fact that the publication found a substantial increase in debt relates more to what the FEC form asks of candidates rather than any fault of Trump. The form requires candidates disclose their assets and debts in ranges up to $50 million, instead of precise numbers.

The Trump Organization's chief financial officer, Weisselberg, also told The Times that debts for properties where a Trump company owned less than a 100% stake were not disclosed on the form.

For the investigation, The Times partnered with national property-information firm RedVision Systems to search publicly available data on more than 30 US properties, identified through Federal Election Commission (FEC) filings and information provided by Trump, like filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Although the investigation covered a variety of documents and records, The Times concentrated on commercial holdings, such as office towers, golf courses, residential properties, and other endeavors, but exempted Trump's businesses outside the US.

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