Veterinarians say dogs in Colorado need sunscreen

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Vets Warn Your Pets Need Sunscreen Too

DENVER -- Sunscreen for dogs might sound like a gimmick. But veterinarians say your pet may be at risk without it.

Since we are closer to the sun at our altitude in Colorado, dogs are getting skin cancer from spending too much time outside.

Ashley Michels shows us what we can do to protect our pets in her video report.

Scroll through to see more ways you can protect your pets:

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NTP: High-end cancer treatments for pets
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NTP: High-end cancer treatments for pets
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary intern Dr. Brittani Jones holds Arnold, a dachshund, 14, while he continues recovery from anesthesia after a CT scan at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. "He just wants to be cuddled," says Jones. The clinic opened last month with a 22-member team that treats about 120 animals each week. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Harlem residents Deirdre Aherne, left, and Marilyn Benetatos, right, sit with their dog Lulu, a 14 year-old tzu-poodle mix receiving outpatient chemotherapy, during a visit to Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center new Cancer Institute in New York. Lulu had been given a mere three months to live when the tzu-poodle mix was diagnosed with lymphoma. That was four years ago. Thanks to about $30,000 in treatments at the Animal Medical Center and its new Cancer Institute, the dog recently marked a 14th birthday. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary oncologist Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, left, stands by as veterinary assistant Rahkim Carlton treats Lulu, right, a tzu-poodle mix receiving outpatient chemotherapy, at the Animal Medical Center's new Cancer Institute in New York. Lulu had been given a mere three months to live when she was diagnosed with lymphoma. That was four years ago. Thanks to about $30,000 in treatments at the Animal Medical Center and its new Cancer Institute, the dog recently marked a 14th birthday. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Lola, a 9-year-old Havanese battling pancreatic cancer, receives a treatment of chemotherapy, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Lola's owner, Dominique Milbank, a Manhattan resident, waited in a quiet, private room, impatient and worried until she got the news: The six-month-long course of chemo has been successful. Her dogâs cancer is in remission.(AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, chief of oncology Dr. Nicole Leibman, left, veterinary assistant Rahkim Carlton, center, and oncologist nurse Malia Mckenna, right, prepare Lola, a 9-year-old Havanese battling pancreatic cancer, for a treatment of chemotherapy, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Lola's owner, Dominique Milbank, a Manhattan resident, waited in a quiet, private room, impatient and worried until she got the news: The six-month-long course of chemo has been successful. Her dogâs cancer is in remission. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, laser beams are aligned onto Dakota, a giant 7-year old Bernese mountain dog, to mark an area where radiation will be administered for a snout tumor, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Experts say there has been a boom in recent years in high-end animal clinics using technologically advanced equipment and medicines that are the same as those in many human hospitals. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, monitors show the head of Arnold, a 14-year-old dachshund diagnosed with a nasal mass during a CT scan at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. The clinic opened last month with a 22-member team that treats about 120 animals each week. Machines include a CT imaging scanner and linear radiation accelerator, which were built for humans and require animals to be anesthetized and tied down to lie perfectly still. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Arnold, a 14-year-old dachshund diagnosed with a nasal mass, is prepared for a CT scan, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattan's Animal Medical Center in New York. The clinic opened last month with a 22-member team that treats about 120 animals each week. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary resident Dr. Ariana Verrilli updates a dry-erase board listing the dayâs schedule of cancer treatments, at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center new Cancer Institute in New York. The center operates 24 hours a day and treats more than 44,000 animal patients, with valuable information from the medicine practiced there helping in the treatment of human beings. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary nurse and radiation technician Corrado Picarulli, left, and veterinary assistant Yoshiaki Kobayashi prepare Dakota, a giant 7-year old Bernese mountain dog, for radiation treatment of a snout tumor, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary nurse and radiation technician Corrado Picarulli sits with Dakota, a giant 7-year old Bernese mountain dog, after he received radiation treatment for a snout tumor, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. The clinic opened last month with a 22-member team that treats about 120 animals each week. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, rehab veterinary technician Idalia Padilla, works with Phoebe, a 10-year old labrador using an under-water treadmill to help her recover from knee surgery, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Experts say there has been a boom in recent years in high-end animal clinics using technologically advanced equipment and medicines that are the same as those in many human hospitals. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Arnold, a 14-year-old dachshund diagnosed with a nasal mass, awakes from anesthesia after undergoing a CT scan, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Experts say there has been a boom in recent years in high-end animal clinics using technologically advanced equipment and medicines that are the same as those in many human hospitals. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary nurse and radiation technician Corrado Picarulli, right, and veterinary assistant Yoshiaki Kobayashi, left, lift Dakota, a giant 7-year old Bernese mountain dog, onto a linear accelerator to administer radiation treatment for a snout tumor, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. The clinic opened last month with a 22-member team that treats about 120 animals each week. Machines include a CT imaging scanner and linear radiation accelerator, which were built for humans and require animals to be anesthetized and tied down to lie perfectly still. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, laser beams mark Arnold, a 14-year-old dachshund diagnosed with a nasal mass, for a CT scan procedure, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Experts say there has been a boom in recent years in high-end animal clinics using technologically advanced equipment and medicines that are as good as that in many human hospitals. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, oncology nurse Malia Mckenna carries Oliver, a 10-year-old Jack Russell terrier, after an examination, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. The center operates 24 hours a day and treats more than 44,000 animal patients, with valuable information from the medicine practiced there helping in the treatment of human beings. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, veterinary student Katie Reynolds, center, observes as chief of oncology Dr. Nicole Leibman, left, and veterinary intern Dr. Samantha Schlemmer, right, prepare to examine a standard poodle named Bacchus for a possible oral mass, at the new Cancer Institute at Manhattanâs Animal Medical Center in New York. Experts say there has been a boom in recent years in high-end animal clinics using technologically advanced equipment and medicines that are the same as those in many human hospitals. And itâs led to a vigorous ethical debate whether such treatments, costing as much as tens of thousands of dollars per patient, should really go toward keeping pets alive. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
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