Meet Jeremy Shuler, 12-year-old Cornell freshman

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Meet Jeremy Shuler.

He's starting at Cornell University next week. He, like many other incoming freshmen, is pretty smart, using those brains to major in applied and engineering physics and minoring in mathematics.

Oh, and by the way – he's 12.

The Texas whiz kid will begin at the New York college in late August, making him what the school's historian told the Washington Post may be the youngest student in the school's history.

"I was excited when I found out I got accepted to Cornell," Jeremy said, according to a post on Texas Tech University's website. "It is the best choice for me."

Jeremy already has his high school diploma – something that most kids his age won't achieve for another six years.

The 12-year-old was home-schooled by his parents through the Texas Tech University Independent School District. The online program lets students work at their own pace, according to the school's website.

Jeremy's SAT score was in the 99.6 percentile of all college-bound seniors in 2014. In addition to the SAT, he's also taken AP exams.

And like any other student, he applied to colleges, getting into Cornell in March. The acceptance letter, however, came with one major caveat: His parents had to follow him to Ithaca.

Jeremy's dad, Andy – a Cornell alumnus – works for Lockheed Martin, Fortunately for the family, the aerospace company has a branch in Ithaca.

Jeremy will begin classes in calculus, physics in mechanics and spatial relativity. He will also take computing classes and Latin.

"While this is highly unusual, we feel that with the strong support of his parents – who will be moving here to provide him a place to live and study," Cornell Engineering Dean Lance Collins said, according to the Texas Tech report, "and his unusual talents and thirst for knowledge, he will be able to thrive as an engineering student and take advantage of all that Cornell has to offer."

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