This one lake is so deadly it kills almost everything except flamingos

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This one lake is so deadly it kills almost everything except flamingos

Lake Natron in Tanzania is a literal hell on earth for most animals. The pH and temperature levels in the water are so high it can burn off the skin and eyes of animals that aren't adapted to it.

But for one species, it is one of the last places on earth they can survive.

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Over 1.5 Million of lesser flamingos flock to Lake Natron each year to breed. The lake is one place makes up over half of the world's lesser flamingos.

See images of the deadly lake:

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Lake Natron
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Lake Natron
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes are pictured on September 30, 2011 in Lake Natron. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes are pictured on September 30, 2011 in Lake Natron. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes fly over Lake Natron on September 30, 2011. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
KENYA - CIRCA 1900: Kenya - Lake Natron beaten by the sand winds. (Photo by Jean-Luc MANAUD/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY HELEN VESPERINI- Lesser flamingoes are pictured in Lake Natron on September 30, 2011. Salmon-coloured clouds of flamingoes sweeping overhead is a common sight at east Africa's Rift Valley lakes, but the mounds of mud where they lay their eggs are found only here. The caustic waters of Lake Natron form the only breeding ground for east Africa's endangered lesser flamingoes, but the Tanzanian government is determined to revive plans to build a soda ash plant at the lake. AFP PHOTO/TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE---In this 2009 file photo Lesser Flamingoes are seen at lake Natron, Tanzania. Flamingoes in Tanzania's Lake Natron will face a major threat if Tanzania starts mining soda ash from the lake, a wildlife group said Wednesday, Aug 26, 2009. Three-quarters of the world's population of Lesser Flamingoes live and breed in East Africa. Many depend on Tanzania's Lake Natron as a breeding site, the group BirdLife International said. Tanzania's Environment Minister, Batilda Buriani, said the country was still awaiting an environmental assessment before making a final decision, but added "we want to do it in a such way that the flamingos and animals are not affected." Lesser Flamingo stand between four and five feet high, but are the smallest of the six flamingo species.(AP Photo/James Warwick, File)
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They can withstand the deadly waters because of their leathery skin, but their home is in danger.

The Tanzanian government is threatening to start mining the lake for soda ash. Despite the threats, a delicate balance between life and death has been reached between the lake and their pink inhabitants.

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