The heat in NYC means cockroaches are flying, so that's horrifying

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Heat Wave in New York Makes Cockroaches Want to Fly

New Yorkers have a lot to deal with — sky-high rent prices, an overcrowded metro system and a heat wave reaching dangerous temperatures. And now? Flying cockroaches.

DNAinfo published a study on Friday that said the heat wave taking over the Upper East Side apparently signals to the city's roach population that it's time to take flight — and people aren't having it.

SEE MORE: Lightning Struck An Unusual Number Of People This Week In New York

Ken Schumann, a researcher at Bell Environmental Services said, "When it's warm and steamy that seems to be what they like."

The study claims the higher the temperatures, the more the roaches are able to use their muscles. And the more activity they get, the chance of them stopping goes down. Which is probably why in humid states, like Texas and Florida, the flying beasts are just a part of life.

Researchers say the ample trash supply in New York has encouraged the roaches to stick to the ground over the years. On the plus side for the bugs, that trash supply can now provide all the energy needed for the pests to infest the air.

But New Yorkers shouldn't worry too much. The roaches can't fly long distances. Instead, Schumann said, "It's almost like they just glide down."

So stay cool New Yorkers and have fun dodging the newly liberated cockroaches.

Related: Also see these rare cicadas terrorizing the Northeast:

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Cicadas emerging
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Cicadas emerging
A periodical cicada lands on an Iris leaf in a garden in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, May 29, 2015. Brood IV cicadas, the Kansan brood, are emerging in Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa this spring. These periodical cicadas have a 17-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 1998. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
A periodical cicada lands on a Daisy in a garden in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, May 29, 2015. Brood IV cicadas, the Kansan brood, are emerging in Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa this spring. These periodical cicadas have a 17-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 1998. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
A periodical cicada lands on an Iris leaf in a garden in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, May 29, 2015. Cicadas last as long as it takes for them to mate and run our of energy which translates to about four weeks of singing. These periodical cicadas have a 17-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 1998. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
Picture shows a cicada or cigale on a tree on August 4, 2013 in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, southeastern France. AFP PHOTO / VALERY HACHE (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
A cicada, a symbol of France's south-eastern area of Provence, is pictured on a tree on July 28, 2013 in Marseille. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A 13-year cicada peers over a ledge in Chapel Hill, N.C., Wednesday, May 11, 2011. Portions of the southern states are currently experiencing the emergence of the periodic cicadas, which tunnel their way to the surface to shed their skin and mate after 13 years underground. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
A cicada pokes its head out of a shrub, Wednesday, June 9, 2004, in Newport, Pa. Cicada courtship is just now reaching its peak in central Pennsylvania after a 17-year wait. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
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