Clinton enlists undocumented immigrants to reach Latino voters

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Clinton Hopes 'Mi Sueño, Tu Voto' Will Boost Latino Votes

Hillary Clinton is hoping a new program will help her tap into two huge voting blocs: young people and Latinos.

SEE MORE: President Obama's Immigration Plan Isn't Dead, Just Deferred

The program is called "Mi Sueño, Tu Voto," which translates to "My Dream, Your Vote." Basically, the campaign would enlist the political power of DREAMers — undocumented immigrants who have been in America since they were kids — to encourage other Latinos to register and vote for Clinton.

Related: See images from the Supreme Court's ruling on Obama's executive action on immigration

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Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists holding an American flag rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists holding an American flag and a large Michigan sign rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigration activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court as justices hear arguments in a challenge by 26 states over the constitutionality of President Barack Obama's executive action to defer deportation of certain immigrant children and parents who are in the country illegally in Washington April 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Immigrants and community leaders rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court to mark the one-year anniversary of President Barack Obama's executive orders on immigration in Washington, November 20, 2015. The Obama administration on Friday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to revive President Barack Obama's executive action to protect millions of illegal immigrants from deportation, saying Republican-led states had no legal basis to challenge it. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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In a statement, Astrid Silva, a DREAMer and Clinton supporter, said, "We may not have the right to vote, but 'Mi Sueño, Tu Voto' will help ensure that our stories are heard, and it will send a clear signal to Donald Trump that we cannot be silenced."

The new program comes on the fourth anniversary of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, also called DACA, which helped shield thousands of DREAMers from deportation. The Clinton campaign is banking on Trump's extreme unpopularity with Latinos to win in states like Florida, Nevada and maybe even Arizona.

And with Clinton promising to introduce a pathway to citizenship within her first 100 days and Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric being the major plank of his campaign, the 27.3 million eligible Latino voters hold more sway than ever before.

And banking on the DREAMers to take the reins here is likely a good bet. DACA came around largely because of that group pressuring the Obama administration.

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