Top Republicans still refusing to endorse Donald Trump

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Mitt Romney: 'Trump Is a Fraud'

Donald Trump was officially named the Republican presidential nominee during July's Republican National Convention--but some party leaders are still not on board with his candidacy.

During the week long gathering in Cleveland, while names the likes of Chris Christie and Mitch McConnell tossed their political weight behind the billionaire businessman, a number of prominent GOPers not only skipped the convention but have refused to endorse the party's ticket.

Perhaps the most high-profile political snub of the 2016 election cycle came at the hands of Texas Senator Ted Cruz, who was promptly booed after failing to endorse Trump during his prime-time address at the RNC.

Click through to see Republicans who refuse to support Donald Trump:

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Politicians who refuse to support Donald Trump
ABC NEWS - 7/20/16 - Coverage of the 2016 Republican National Convention from the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, which airs on all ABC News programs and platforms. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) SEN. TED CRUZ
Former Republican U.S. presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks critically about current Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and the state of the 2016 Republican presidential campaign during a speech at the Hinckley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah March 3, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
Former President George W. Bush campaigns for his brother Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush Monday, Feb. 15, 2016, in North Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Jeb Bush, former Governor of Florida and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, listens to an audience question during a town hall event hosted by CNN at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Donald Trump remains the front-runner in South Carolina, where Republican voters head to the polls on Saturday. According to a survey released Monday by Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling, Trump holds a 17-point lead over Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, who are tied for second place. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
ROCKVILLE, MD - APRIL 25: Republican presidential candidate and Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during a campaign event April 25, 2016 in Rockville, Maryland. Governor Kasich continued to seek for his party's nomination for the general election. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 10: Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) speaks with reporters before a weekly policy meeting with Senate Republicans, at the U.S. Capitol, May 10, 2016, in Washington, DC. Presidential candidate Donald Trump is scheduled meet with Republican House and Senate leadership on Thursday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
CNBC EVENTS -- The Republican Presidential Debate: Your Money, Your Vote -- Pictured: George Pataki participates in CNBC's 'Your Money, Your Vote: The Republican Presidential Debate' live from the University of Colorado Boulder in Boulder, Colorado Wednesday, October 28th at 6PM ET / 8PM ET -- (Photo by: David A. Grogan/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Former U.S. President George H. W. Bush smiles while wearing a pink shirt to raise breast cancer awareness on the sidelines of the Houston Texans versus New York Giants NFL football game in Houston October 10, 2010. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT FOOTBALL)
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Following the controversial speech, Cruz said he is "not in the habit of supporting people who attack my wife and attack my father."

"Wow, Ted Cruz got booed off the stage, didn't honor the pledge!" Trump tweeted following Cruz's speech. "I saw his speech two hours early but let him speak anyway. No big deal!"

While Cruz made an appearance at the RNC, a few of Trump's defeated primary rivals skipped the big Cleveland event, including the governor of The Buckeye State John Kasich.

When asked if he would support the Republican nominee, Kasich said, "Why would I feel compelled to support someone whose positions I kind of fundamentally disagree with?"

Previous Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney has also refused to endorse the former reality TV star, even making a point to make speeches voicing his disappointment with the GOP candidate. "Here's what I know. Donald Trump is a phony, a fraud. His promises are as worthless as a degree from Trump University," Romney said in March.

Trump fired back at Romney saying he "understand losers, you can make a lot of money with losers," adding that Romney's 2012 presidential run was a failure because the former Massachusetts governor "choked like a dog, he's a choker."

Not only haven't previous Republican presidential nominees not backed Trump, but both living former Republican presidents, George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush, have abstained from supporting the 2016 GOP ticket.

George W. Bush, who has supported every GOP ticket since leaving office, has said he is worried he may be "the last Republican president." While George H. W. Bush has made it clear that after campaigning for his son Jeb Bush, who also refuses to back Trump, he has no plans to endorse.

Paul Ryan is one big-name Republican who eventually threw his support behind Trump after initially saying he was "not there right now" when asked if he would endorse the billionaire businessman.

Trump recently returned the favor by saying he was "not quite there yet" when regarding the endorsement of Ryan in the Wisconsin primary.

"I like Paul, but these are horrible times for our country."

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