Millions of sunflowers bloom in Japan and the images are stunning

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Why Do Sunflowers Turn to the Sun?

More than a million sunflowers are in full bloom at the Serakogen Nojo flower farm in Sera, Japan. The Sunflower Festival is held at the flower farm every year and visitors travel near and far to get the chance to walk through the giant fields.

Check out the stunning photographs below:

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Image: BUDDHIKA WEERASINGHE/Getty Images

Scroll through below to see another incredible flower:

7 PHOTOS
Corpse Flower
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Corpse Flower
An Amorphophallus titanum begins to bloom at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Thursday, July 28, 2016, in New York. The rare plant releases scent during its brief 24â36-hour peak, like the smell of rotting flesh, the reason the plant is popularly known as the corpse flower. It is the first time since 1939 that the NYBG has displayed a blooming titan-arum. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
An Amorphophallus titanum begins to bloom at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Thursday, July 28, 2016, in New York. The rare plant releases scent during its brief 24â36-hour peak, like the smell of rotting flesh, the reason the plant is popularly known as the corpse flower. It is the first time since 1939 that the NYBG has displayed a blooming titan-arum. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
An Amorphophallus titanum begins to bloom at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Thursday, July 28, 2016, in New York. The rare plant releases scent during its brief 24â36-hour peak, like the smell of rotting flesh, the reason the plant is popularly known as the corpse flower. It is the first time since 1939 that the NYBG has displayed a blooming titan-arum. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
People walk near an Amorphophallus titanum which begins to bloom at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Thursday, July 28, 2016, in New York. The rare plant releases scent during its brief 24â36-hour peak, like the smell of rotting flesh, the reason the plant is popularly known as the corpse flower. It is the first time since 1939 that the NYBG has displayed a blooming titan-arum. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
An Amorphophallus titanum begins to bloom at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Thursday, July 28, 2016, in New York. The rare plant releases scent during its brief 24â36-hour peak, like the smell of rotting flesh, the reason the plant is popularly known as the corpse flower. It is the first time since 1939 that the NYBG has displayed a blooming titan-arum. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
The petals of a rare Corpse flower about to unfurl, left, sit beside the non-flowering version of the plant, right, inside the Haupt Conservatory, Thursday, July 28, 2016, at the New York Botanical Garden in New York. According to the garden, the species, which is native to Sumatra, Indonesia, last bloomed there in 1939. When the petals open, they are only open for a brief 24 to 36-hour window when the plant releases a pungent scent like rotting flesh to attract flies and other pollinators, hence the name. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
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