Poll: One-in-five U.S. Republicans want Trump to drop out

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Republicans Abandoning Trump

NEW YORK, Aug 10 (Reuters) - Nearly one-fifth of registered Republicans want Donald Trump to drop out of the race for the White House, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Wednesday, reflecting the turmoil his candidacy has sown within his party.

Some 19 percent think the New York real estate magnate should drop out, 70 percent think he should stay in and 10 percent say they "don't know," according to the Aug. 5-8 poll of 396 registered Republicans. The poll has a confidence interval of six percentage points.

Among all registered voters, some 44 percent want Trump to drop out. That is based on a survey of 1,162 registered voters, with a confidence interval of 3 percentage points. That is 9 points higher than his support for the presidency in the latest Reuters/Ipsos tracking poll registered on Monday.

The figures underscored deep divisions within the Republican Party over Trump's candidacy. A number of prominent Republicans have declined to endorse him in the Nov. 8 election against Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, citing his fiery rhetoric and policy proposals such as building a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border and temporarily banning Muslims from entering the country.

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ABC NEWS - 7/20/16 - Coverage of the 2016 Republican National Convention from the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, which airs on all ABC News programs and platforms. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) SEN. TED CRUZ
Former Republican U.S. presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks critically about current Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and the state of the 2016 Republican presidential campaign during a speech at the Hinckley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah March 3, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
Former President George W. Bush campaigns for his brother Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush Monday, Feb. 15, 2016, in North Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Jeb Bush, former Governor of Florida and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, listens to an audience question during a town hall event hosted by CNN at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Donald Trump remains the front-runner in South Carolina, where Republican voters head to the polls on Saturday. According to a survey released Monday by Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling, Trump holds a 17-point lead over Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, who are tied for second place. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
ROCKVILLE, MD - APRIL 25: Republican presidential candidate and Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during a campaign event April 25, 2016 in Rockville, Maryland. Governor Kasich continued to seek for his party's nomination for the general election. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 10: Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) speaks with reporters before a weekly policy meeting with Senate Republicans, at the U.S. Capitol, May 10, 2016, in Washington, DC. Presidential candidate Donald Trump is scheduled meet with Republican House and Senate leadership on Thursday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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Former U.S. President George H. W. Bush smiles while wearing a pink shirt to raise breast cancer awareness on the sidelines of the Houston Texans versus New York Giants NFL football game in Houston October 10, 2010. REUTERS/Richard Carson (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT FOOTBALL)
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Trump found himself embroiled in yet another controversy on Tuesday after saying at a rally that gun rights activists could act to stop Clinton from nominating liberal U.S. Supreme Court justices - a comment his campaign said was misinterpreted, but that Clinton's campaign called "dangerous."

"If she gets to pick her judges, nothing you can do folks," Trump said at the rally at the University of North Carolina. "Although the Second Amendment people, maybe there is, I don't know," he continued. The U.S. Constitution's Second Amendment guarantees a right to keep and bear arms.

He had previously stirred criticism for engaging in a spat with the parents of a Muslim U.S. soldier killed in Iraq. Republican Senator Susan Collins said on Monday that that dispute led her to announce she would not vote for Trump.

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In addition, 50 prominent national security experts signed an open letter saying they would not vote for Trump in the fall, saying he "lacks the character, values, and experience" to be president. Trump dismissed the group as part of the Washington establishment that he blames for many of the United States' problems.

To be sure, neither Trump nor Clinton enjoys great popularity. Some 53 percent of Americans have an unfavorable view of Clinton, who has been accused of mishandling her emails as secretary of state, according to Reuters/Ipsos polling.

Nearly 63 percent have an unfavorable view of Trump.

Clinton led Trump by more than 7 percentage points in a Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Tuesday, up from a less than 3-percentage-point lead late last week.

RELATED: Republicans' opinion on Trump dropping out

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