Police departments will have to report 'police-related deaths'

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DOJ Revamps How It Gets Arrest-Related Death Information

It's been about a month since the fatal police shootings of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling sparked protests and outrage across the nation.

Now, it appears the U.S. Department of Justice is revamping how it collects information on deaths involving law enforcement.

According to a DOJ notice published in the Federal Register, the Arrest-Related Deaths program will require all law enforcement agencies to report any "law enforcement homicides," which include officer-involved shootings and deaths due to complications from stun guns, among other things. They'll also need to report "other homicides, accidents, suicides, or deaths due to natural causes."

SEE MORE: These Are The Black People Police Have Shot And Killed This Year

The over 19,400 state and local law enforcement agencies and more than 680 medical examiner's or coroner's offices across the U.S. will report the deaths quarterly.

The DOJ has collected this type of data before but describes this change as "a hybrid approach."

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Alton Sterling protests
Stephanie McDee, who said she is a local blues singer, sings a song and protests at a makeshift memorial for Alton Sterling, outside a convenience store in Baton Rouge, La., Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Sterling was shot and killed by Baton Rouge police outside the store where he was selling CDs. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
People march outside the Triple S convenience store in Baton Rouge, La., Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Alton Sterling was shot and killed outside the store where he was selling CDs Tuesday by Baton Rouge police. The U.S. Justice Department opened a civil rights investigation Wednesday into the videotaped police killing of Sterling. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Children hold signs reading "Black Lives Matter" outside the Triple S convenience store in Baton Rouge, La., Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Alton Sterling was shot and killed outside the store where he was selling CDs Tuesday by Baton Rouge police. The U.S. Justice Department opened a civil rights investigation Wednesday into the videotaped police killing of Sterling. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
People protest after Alton Sterling, 37, was shot and killed during an altercation with two Baton Rouge police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S. on July 5, 2016. REUTERS/Bryn Stole
People march outside the Triple S convenience store in Baton Rouge, La., Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Alton Sterling was shot and killed outside the store where he was selling CDs Tuesday by Baton Rouge police. The U.S. Justice Department opened a civil rights investigation Wednesday into the videotaped police killing of Sterling. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Children hold signs reading "Black Lives Matter" outside the Triple S convenience store in Baton Rouge, La., Wednesday, July 6, 2016. Alton Sterling was shot and killed outside the store Tuesday by Baton Rouge police, where he was selling CDs. The U.S. Justice Department opened a civil rights investigation Wednesday into the videotaped police killing of Sterling. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Arthur Baines signs "RIP Big Dogg" on a folding table that Alton Sterling used to sell homemade music CDs outside the convenience store, Wednesday, July 6, 2016, in Baton Rouge, La. A Louisiana police officer shot and killed, Sterling, 37, a black man during a confrontation outside the store, authorities said, prompting hundreds to protest at the site where the man died. (AP Photo/Michael Kunzelman)
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After receiving a new report of an arrest-related death, the department would then request information from law enforcement agencies and medical examiners' or coroners' offices related to specific incidents reported in the initial form.

The public can offer feedback on the program until October.

Law enforcement agencies will have to submit one form for the entire year of 2016. Beginning in 2017, they'll submit the forms every quarter.

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