A giant anemone in deep ocean stumps scientists

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A Giant Anemone In Deep Ocean Stumps Scientists

Researchers with the NOAA's Okeanos Explorer expedition recently spotted an anemone which one member called "whopping big."

According to an online post, the sighting occurred on July 30.

Footage of the event shows a white anemone, estimated to be around 8 to 12 inches across.

Researchers can also be heard marveling at its unusual rounded-tipped tentacles with a brown point in the middle of each one.

This anemone was found during an exploration of the Alba Seamount which has been dated back to the Cretaceous period.

The footage was gathered as part of NOAA's Deepwater Wonders of Wake mission exploring the "deep-sea ecosystems and seafloor in and around the Wake Atoll Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument."

RELATED: NOAA Ocean Explorer sea creatures:

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NOAA Ocean Explorer sea creatures

A purple crinoid hangs out on a dead coral stalk.

(Photo via NOAA)

D2 discovered one of the largest aggregations of brisingid sea stars anyone on the ship had ever seen.

(Photo: NOAA)

Seeing two deep sea animals interacting with each other is rare. What is particularly rare is when they behave the opposite of how we expect them to. As we approached this armored sea robin, a brittle star climbed on top. We were pretty sure that the fish would try to eat the brittle star, but as it turns out, it just wanted to dislodge the extra baggage. The brittle star then proceeded to climb on top of the sea robin two more times.

(Photo via NOAA)

Benthic jellyfish.

(Photo via NOAA)

Brisingid sea stars.

(Photo via NOAA)

Ceramaster granularis. (Goniasteridae)

(Photo via NOAA)

Neomorphaster forcipatus (Stichasteridae).

(Photo via NOAA)

This beautiful hydromedusa was imaged in Washington Canyon. Unfortunately, none of the scientists watching the dive live specialized in water column life.  However, due to the pace at which telepresence allows us to disseminate information, the video of this organism was quickly circulated around the country to experts in the field and the hydromedusa was identified as Cyclocanna welshi with a couple days.

(Photo via NOAA)

We imaged this purple octopus with large glassy eyes during dive #8. 

(Photo via NOAA)

Crossota sp., a deep red medusa found just off the bottom of the deep sea.

(Photo via NOAA)

Anemone attached to a carbonate boulder near the GC852 sampling station at 1,500 meters depth.

(Photo via NOAA)

A lovely sea cucumber dancing in the water column is imaged by the Little Hercules ROV at approximately 1500 meters depth offshore Kona, Hawaii. Image taken during ROV shakedown operations aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer on March 22, 2010.

(Photo via NOAA)

Here, an octopus mother protects her eggs in Hendrickson Canyon. If you look closely, you can see the eyes of a baby octopus through the egg. 

(Photo via NOAA)

Portrait of a juvenile boxfish, 1 cm long, collected by a bluewater diver in the top 30 meters of the Celebes Sea water column.

(Photo via NOAA)

Image of the breathtaking squid captured on camera during ROV Dive 3.

(Photo via NOAA)

Rock hind in a sponge photographed while free diving off Klien Bonaire in about 20 ft. of water.  Image courtesy of Bonaire 2008: Exploring Coral Reef Sustainability with New Technologies, Chris Coccaro, NOAA-OE.

(Photo via NOAA)

(Photo via NOAA)
(Photo via NOAA)
(Photo via NOAA)
(Photo via NOAA)

This stunning octopod, Benthoctopus sp., seemed quite interested in ALVIN's port manipulator arm. Those inside the sub were surprised by the octopod's inquisitive behavior.

(Photo via NOAA)

This giant isopod is a representative of one of approximately nine species of large isopods (crustaceans related to shrimps and crabs) in the genus Bathynomus. They are thought to be abundant in cold, deep waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Bob Carney of LSU caught this specimen in one of his deep-water fish traps.

(Photo via NOAA)

Aulococtena is the size and color of an orange and has two tentacles that are white, thick, unbranched and very sticky. This species has been encountered from 350-1100 meters deep on this expedition.

(Photo via NOAA)

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