Man repeatedly vandalized grave due to a 56-year-old grudge

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Man Repeatedly Vandailzed Grave Due to a 56-year-old Grudge

It's often said that forgiveness frees the soul, but many prefer taking a different path towards inner peace.

In the case of Paul E. Donovan Jr., a 69-year-old man from Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, that route involved repeatedly vandalizing the grave of the man he claims stole $300 from him over 50 years ago.

The defacing of the headstone began in the spring of 2014 and typically involved the use of spray paint, though he did once cover the marker with a dark, tar-like substance, reports WCAU.

The authorities set up hidden cameras to catch the vandal.

According to the official police complaint, after being caught, Donovan said he was willing to, "pay back any restitution minus the $300 he was owed over 56 years ago."

On Tuesday, he pleaded guilty to the offenses in court.

In addition to being ordered to pay the family, Donovan was placed on a 2-year probation.

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China's grave cleansing ritual
A woman prays in front of a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man repaints the letters on a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Graves are seen during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman cleans a tombstone during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Women walk past graves adorned with offerings during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman cleans leaves an offering on a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks past tombstones during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays in front of a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man repaints the letters on a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays in front of a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A woman pours alcohol over a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays at the grave of her parents during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prepares to burn incense at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman looks at graves adorned with various offerings during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A family burn incense at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - People visit and tend to graves during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
Food, incense and other offerings are pictured on a grave, left by loved ones for the departed, during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man (2nd R) prays and burns incense at the grave of his parents and sister during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman stands between a row of graves during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
So called 'spirit money' burns next to a grave as an offering during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man burns offerings at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man (L) prays and burns incense at the grave of his parents and sister during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man (R) repaints the engravings on a gravestone during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman burns incense at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
An aerial view shows that people burn joss paper money as they pray at a public cemetery during Qingming Festival, or Tomb Sweeping Festival, in Fuzhou, Jiangxi Province, China, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA.
Participants wear traditional costumes at a celebration to worship Yellow Emperor Xuan Yuan, who is considered by many to be the ancestor of the Chinese, during Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Festival, in Hangling county, Shaanxi Province, China, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/China Daily ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA.
Participants hold bamboo sticks as they push to row boats during a traditional celebration for Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Festival, in Taizhou, Jiangsu Province, China, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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