Snapchat star Audrey Spencer on how social media can take over this election

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Audrey Spencer made her debut on social media posting artistic renderings of her cats on Snapchat. By day she does product design, but in her free time she takes over the Snapchat world as Cakes1toDough1. It's even how she met her boyfriend. Although she is from Boston and he was from L.A. -- she calls it their "modern love story". Being a Snapchat influencer has brought her thousands of followers and has led her to cover the 2016 Republican National Convention for Cleveland.com.

While Audrey is still in shock that having two cats led to attending the 2016 RNC -- AOL.com editors caught up with her at the convention as she discussed her experience.

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What exactly are you doing at the RNC?
What I've been doing is walking around asking people, not getting my political views involved because I don't want to do that. I'm just sharing my experience and the experience of being here. I want to talk to people, interact with people and come up with a question that isn't off-putting or subjective in anyway. So I ask people what they think about cats.

With my background in Snapchat drawing funny pictures of my cats and a lot of people had the weirdest answers. People will respond, "cats, you mean like the animal." Others will respond, "No." One guy was selling a "Hillary Sucks" shirt and he was chanting for Trump, so I walked up to him. I said, "Sir can I ask you a question, what do you think about cats." He responded, "I love cats, I have 3 kittens at home." It was seeing an angry person then talking about something that they liked. It made me feel good. It was strange. It was a silly question but it's had an interesting effect that I didn't expect.

SEE ALSO: Elephants are everywhere at the Republican National Convention

What has your experience been like so far?
I think the most grandiose thing I saw was when covering the RNC the first night, I saw Trump come out to "We are the Champions," and there were crazy lights. The amount of people that are there is amazing. The amount of money that has gone into the town to put up fences and all the effort and police presence it just really unique. I'm glad I get to see it.

How do you feel about this election in general?
It's crazy. I think that everyone has very strong opinions. I don't think either candidate is super ideal. I definitely prefer Hillary. I resent the fact that people give her crap about her pant suits because what else is she going to wear, you know? The news has taken an interesting angle on the whole thing. Hyperbolizing a lot of stuff that isn't important to politics. It gets in the way of peoples actual views of what is actually going on for both candidates.

What is the biggest misconception millennials have on the election?
People don't really know how the Electoral College works. To be fairly honest I don't always know either. But the thing is, I've watched videos on it and read Wikipedia articles and done research on voting process and I'm still a little cloudy on how all of it works. A lot of people don't think their vote matters. Even if in a broader sense it doesn't sometimes, I think making the effort and going in and voting even on more local things does matter.

How do you think social media could impact this election?
Social media really gives access to a lot of different ideas and opinions, readily. It's very accessible for the younger generations and it's very consumable. I think it harbors a lot of misinformation because it's not actual media. There's no fact checking and a lot of it is hearsay. I think checking your sources and being knowledgeable about what people are saying is really important. But at the same time social media has a way of permeating young people news. Because you can see what is going on on the ground. My followers are able to see what it's like to be here and what's going on and different views and people might not normally have that from just the news. The news is more polished.

How has social media changed since previous elections?
It's in the hands of more people and more generations of people. It's more accepted. Whereas before Obama had a really good handle on social media and his team was great at that but now more people have a grasp of it and permeates beyond. For instances the news agency Cleveland.com, they hired me to come out here and cover the RNC. That might not have been a thing in 2008. They would have been, "What is Snapchat, why do we need that?". It's value has definitely changed.

Check out more from the 2016 conventions:

22 PHOTOS
Best DNC moments
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Best DNC moments
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - AUGUST 28: Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Most of the Democratic Presidential candidates including Clinton, Bernie Sanders , Martin O'Malley and Lincoln Chafee are attending at the event. (Photo by Adam Bettcher/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 23: Democratic Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks at the Democratic National Committee's Women's Leadership Forum October 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The DNC is holding its 22nd Annual Women's Conference. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (2nd-R) celebrates on stage with husband former US president Bill Clinton (R), running mate Tim Kaine (2nd-L), and son-in-law Marc Mezvinsky (L) on the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Khizr Khan, father of deceased U.S. Army Capt. Humayun S. M. Khan, delivers remarks as he is joined by his wife Ghazala Khan on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Crowds cheer during the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on July 28, 2016. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Delegates from Arkansas, some dressed in costumes, sit at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on July 28, 2016. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Hillary Clinton celebrates on stage after accepting the Presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on July 28, 2016. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
ABC NEWS - 7/28/16 - Coverage of the 2016 Democratic National Convention from the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA which airs on all ABC News programs and platforms. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) BALLOON DROP
ABC NEWS - 7/28/16 - Coverage of the 2016 Democratic National Convention from the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, PA which airs on all ABC News programs and platforms. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) KATY PERRY
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: A delegate films the singing of the U.S. National Anthem on the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: (EDITORS NOTE: This image was converted using digital filters) A Spectator shows her fingernails painted with Hillary Clintons likeness the 2016 Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center on July 25, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Mike Coppola/WireImage)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Bernie Sanders supporters protest as Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Chelsea Clinton delivers remarks on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe on the convention floor on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Virginia delegate Morgan Jameson sports patriotic fashion during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Virginia delegate Morgan Jameson sports patriotic fashion during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Connecticut delegate Audrey Blondin wears anti Donald Trump buttons as part of her costume, during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 28: Matthew Larding (left) and Thelma Sias, members of the Wisconsin delegation, observe the invocation during the final day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Thursday, July 28, 2016. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26: An delegate hold up a sign in support of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 27: An attendee holds a phone with a Hillary Clinton themed case on the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton received the number of votes needed to secure the party's nomination. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 27: An attendee wears a cape in support of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during the third day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 27, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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