Buffett rebukes Trump, unveils voter turnout effort

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Buffet roasts Trump

OMAHA, Neb., Aug 1 (Reuters) - Billionaire investor Warren Buffett on Monday campaigned alongside Democrat Hillary Clinton at a rowdy rally in his home state of Nebraska, where he challenged Republican Donald Trump to release his tax returns and said he would personally drive people to the polls in November.

After delivering a forceful rebuke of Trump's recent statements about the Muslim parents of a decorated American soldier killed in Iraq, Buffett said he wanted to surprise Clinton and "make a little news" by announcing the launch of a get-out-the vote effort.

"I pledge today that on Election Day, Nov. 8, I will take at least 10 people to the polls who would otherwise have difficulty getting there," Buffett said.

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Buffett also said he was backing a website, Drive2Vote, that would coordinate transportation to cast votes and that he had reserved a trolley that seats 32 people for the same purpose.

"I'm going to be on it all day. I'm going to do selfies, whatever it takes," Buffett said.

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Important people who support Hillary Clinton (Politicians, famous figures, other celebs)

Warren Buffett, chairman and chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., smiles during an event with Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, in Omaha, Nebraska, U.S., on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. Buffet said at the rally that he was supporting Clinton's bid for president because they share a commitment to help the less affluent. (Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Governor Jerry Brown, seen here with then-candidate Bill Clinton in 1992, notoriously did not like the Clintons for years, but announced a week before the California primary that he would back Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Cynthia Johnson/Getty)
Actor Leonardo DiCaprio, seen here at the 2016 Vanity Fair Oscar Party, hasn't formally endorsed Hillary Clinton but he has donated $2700 to her campaign and backed her in 2008. (Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)
Walter Mondale was the first former Democratic vice president to endorse Clinton (REUTERS/Craig Lassig)
Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., has been an early Clinton backer, seen here at a 'Super Tuesday' watch party her campaign in Atlanta, Ga., March 1, 2016. He is famous for his work fighting for civil rights alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
LEBANON, NH - JANUARY 09: Former U.S. Women's National Soccer Team captain Abby Wambach smiles while she is introduced to a crowd at a Hillary Clinton campaign office on January 9, 2016 in Lebanon, New Hampshire. Wambach highlighted Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's commitment to standing up for women and girls. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
Singer Demi Lovato, seen here onstage at WE Day California 2016, is a Clinton supporter. (Photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images for WE Day )
Actress and screenwriter Lena Dunham campaigns for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Eight Seven Central screen printers in Des Moines, Iowa, January 9, 2016. REUTERS/Brian C. Frank
Singer Katy Perry, center, holds a sign in support of Hillary Clinton, former U.S. secretary of state and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, as Clinton speaks at the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2015. With Vice President Joe Biden officially out of the presidential race, the nation's first nominating contest between front-runner Clinton and Senator Bernie Sanders is gaining steam, according to a new Bloomberg Politics/Des Moines Register Iowa Poll. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, seen here working with Clinton when they were Senate colleagues, was an early supporter of the former secretary of state. (REUTERS/William Philpott WP/SV)
Actress Kerry Washington, seen here at a 30th anniversary presentation at the 2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards, is a Clinton supporter. (Adrees Latif / Reuters)
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Buffett, a Clinton backer, said his goal is to generate the highest voter turnout in the congressional district that includes Omaha of any in the country. Nebraska is one of just two U.S. states that award electoral votes in presidential elections by congressional district. Buffett, whose Berkshire Hathaway conglomerate is based in Omaha, stressed that this gives power to Omaha residents to affect the outcome of the election.

Clinton responded to Buffett's pledge with a promise of her own, if his turnout goal is met.

"Warren and I will dance in the streets of Omaha together! Maybe if we're really lucky he'll wear his Elvis costume again!" Clinton said.

Buffett earlier challenged Trump to release his tax returns, something that presidential candidates typically do. The New York businessman has said he cannot do so until the Internal Revenue Service has completed an audit.

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"Now I've got news for him," Buffett said. "I'm under audit, too, and I would be delighted to meet him anyplace, anytime, before the election.

"I'll bring my tax return, he can bring his tax return ... and let people ask us questions about the items that are on there," Buffett added, saying Trump was "afraid" not of the IRS but voters.

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Buffett spoke for nearly 30 minutes to a raucous capacity crowd of roughly 3,100 in a high school in suburban Omaha with Clinton sitting at his side. He said the "final straw" was an ABC interview with Trump that aired Sunday in which Trump criticized Khizr Khan and Ghazala Khan.

The Khans took the stage together at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia last week, and Khizr Khan delivered a speech about his son, U.S. Army Captain Humayun Khan, who was killed by a bomb in Iraq 12 years ago. He also attacked Trump for proposing a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States.

Trump has said he was "viciously" attacked by Khizr Khan, a naturalized U.S. citizen and a Muslim, when he publicly doubted the real estate developer had read the U.S. Constitution.

Trump also questioned whether Ghazala Khan, who stood at her husband's side during the address, was "allowed" to speak. Khan had also said that Trump had "sacrificed nothing," prompting Trump in his ABC interview to say, "I think I've made a lot of sacrifices."

Buffett on Monday bluntly contradicted Trump.

"No member of the Buffett family has gone to Iraq or Afghanistan. No member of the Trump family has gone to Iraq or Afghanistan," Buffett said. "We've both done extremely well during this period and our families haven't sacrificed anything."

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