A majority of the world's largest animals could be extinct by 2100

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A Majority of the World's Largest Animals Could Be Extinct by 2100

A majority of the world's largest animals could be extinct by 2100.

Researchers say roughly 60 percent of large carnivores and herbivores are currently at risk.

The situation is especially alarming in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia.

Overhunting and poaching are huge problems, but the growth in the human population and its increased land use are contributors, as well.

See some of the animals facing extinction:

7 PHOTOS
Animals that face extinction by 2100
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Animals that face extinction by 2100
Western lowland gorilla Kamba holds her one-day-old son Zachary at the Brookfield Zoo in Brookfield, Illinois, United States, September 24, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young
A pair of black rhinoceros walk at the Imire Rhino and Wildlife Conservation Park near Marondera, east of Zimbabwe's capital Harare, September 22, 2014. Monday marked World Rhino Day amid dwindling populations of the species due to poaching activities. REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo (ZIMBABWE - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)
A Bengal tiger rests on Global Tiger Day in the jungles of Bannerghatta National Park, 25 kilometers (16 miles) south of Bangalore, India, Wednesday, July 29, 2015. India's latest tiger census conducted in 2014 showed a sharp increase in the number of the endangered cats in the wild. The country has nearly three-fourths of the world's estimated 3,200 tigers. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
UNSPECIFIED - OCTOBER 28: African Wild Ass (Equus africanus) (Photo by DEA / F. PAGNI/De Agostini/Getty Images)
The Visayan warty pigs, Samar (front) and Panay run at their enclosure on January 11, 2013 at the Berlin zoo. The pigs, priginating from the Polish Poznan Zoo are named after two Philippine islands. Today, the endangered species live only on two islands. AFP PHOTO / MARC TIRL /GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read MARC TIRL/AFP/Getty Images)
Bali banteng (Bos javanicus), calf. Garig Ganuk Barlu National Park, Cobourg Peninsula, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. (Photo by Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
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SEE MORE: Kenya Says Its Plan To Burn 105 Tons Of Ivory Will Protect Elephants

When people eliminate large animals, they also eliminate their positive effects on the ecosystem.

A team of conservation biologists says the threat can still be reversed.

But they wrote last week it'll take significant social, political and financial commitments across the world.

Related: Also see animals nearly lost to extinction:

24 PHOTOS
Animals nearly lost to extinction
See Gallery
Animals nearly lost to extinction

Columbian white-tailed deer

(Photo: Getty Images)

Lake Erie water snake

(Photo: Getty Images)

Concho water snake

Gray whale

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Oregon chub

(AP Photo/Freshwaters Illustrated via the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jeremy Monroe)

Black bear

(Photo: Reuters)

 Steller sea lion

(Photo: Eric Gaillard/Reuters)

Virginia northern flying squirrel

(Photo: Alamy)

American Alligator

(Photo: Reuters)

Grey wolf

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Island night lizard

(Photo by Stephen Osman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Eastern grey kangaroo

(Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)

Red Kangaroo

(Photo by ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Western grey kangaroo

(Photo by Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)

Morelets Crocodile 

(Photo: Getty Images)

Peregrine Falcon

(Photo: Getty Images)

Brown Pelican 

(Photo: Mike Blake/Reuters)

Bald eagle 

(Photo: Bob Strong/Reuters)

Aleutian Canada goose

(Photo: Alamy)

Delmarva Peninsula Fox Squirrel

(Photo: Getty Images)

Palau Ground Dove
Tinian Monarch 
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