Florida has identified 10 more Zika cases, calls in feds for help

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10 additional Zika cases likely from Florida mosquitoes



CHICAGO, Aug 1 (Reuters) - The state of Florida has identified 10 more cases of Zika virus caused by local mosquitoes and has asked the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to send in experts to help with its investigation of the outbreak.

The state now has 14 cases of Zika caused by locally transmitted mosquitoes, according to a statement issued on Monday by Florida Governor Rick Scott.

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Scott said the state has called on the CDC to activate a CDC Emergency Response Team (CERT) to assist the Florida Department of Health and other partners in their investigation, sample collection and mosquito control efforts.

The team will consist of public health experts who will augment Florida's response efforts, Scott said.

RELATED: Zika comes to Miami-Dade county

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Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county
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Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade county
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel peers into a drain in Miami's Wynwood district to detect any mosquito presence on Saturday, July 30, 2016. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel stops to write in her log on Northwest 28th Street in Miami's Wynwood district on Saturday, July 30, 2016. On foot and in her truck, Nagel covered a swath of the district to combat any mosquito presence. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Diana Ozuna, with her 20-month-old daughter Lianah, lives in Miami's Wynwood district -- an area in which the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes. On Saturday, July 30, 2016, Ozuna talks about the threat of the virus. She says she takes the threat seriously and applies protective spray on her and her daughter. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control inspector Sharon Nagel drops a chemical tablet into a drain that shows signs of mosquitos in Miami's Wynwood district on Saturday, July 30, 2016. A day earlier, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said that the Zika virus is being transmitted by mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area north of downtown Miami. (Marsha Halper/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Sharon Nagel, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, walks through the Wynwood neighborhood looking for mosquitos or breeding areas where she kills the mosquitos with larvicide granules or a fogger spraying pesticide as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, prepares to use a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, prepares to use a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 30: Robert Muxo, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, uses a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitos in the Wynwood neighborhood as the county fights to control the Zika virus outbreak on July 30, 2016 in Miami, Florida. There have been a reported four individuals that have been infected with the Zika virus by local mosquitoes which makes them the first known cases of the virus being transmitted by mosquitoes in the continental United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Reuters was first to report that as of last Friday, Florida had not activated a CERT team to help with its investigation, raising concerns from infectious disease experts that the state was not taking every step it could to contain the spread of Zika in the continental United States.

CERT teams are a key part of the CDC's national Zika plan and are intended to help local officials track and contain the virus. A similar team was sent to Utah earlier this month to investigate how a person may have become infected while caring for a Zika-infected patient, before local officials went public with the case.

The state said it began investigating its first suspected case of locally transmitted Zika on July 7. According to CDC spokeswoman Kathy Harben, the CDC first became aware of the investigation on July 18, a day before the state announced its investigation into possible local transmission.

RELATED: 50 cities at the most risk for Zika

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50 cities with the most risk for Zika
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50 cities with the most risk for Zika

#50. Midland, Texas

Risk level: 1.38

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 161,290

Photo courtesy: Getty

#49. Yuma, Ariz.

Risk level: 1.38

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 203,247

Photo courtesy: Getty

#48. Laredo, Texas

Risk level: 1.38

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 266,673

Photo courtesy: Getty

#47. El Paso, Texas

Risk level: 1.41

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 836,698

Photo courtesy: Getty

#46. Bakersfield, Calif.

Risk level: 1.42

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 874,589

Photo courtesy: Getty

#45. Albuquerque, New Mexico

Risk level: 1.42

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 904,587

Photo courtesy: Getty

#44. Tucson, Ariz.

Risk level: 1.42

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,004,516

Photo courtesy: Getty

#43. Salt Lake City, Utah

Risk level: 1.43

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,153,340

Photo courtesy: Getty

#42. Fresno, Calif.

Risk level: 1.93

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 965,974

Photo courtesy: Getty

#41. Las Vegas, Nev.

Risk level: 1.99

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 2,069,681

Photo courtesy: Getty

#40. Sacramento, Calif.

Risk level: 2

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 2,244,397

Photo courtesy: Getty

#39. San Antonio, Texas

Risk level: 2.03

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 2,328,652

Photo courtesy: Getty

#38. Denver, Colo.

Risk level: 2.2

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 2,754,258

Photo courtesy: Getty

#37. San Diego, Calif.

Risk level: 2.4

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 3,263,431

Photo courtesy: Getty

#36. Phoenix, Ariz.

Risk level: 2.89

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 4,489,109

Photo courtesy: Getty

#35. Montgomery, Ala.

Risk level: 3.92

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 373,141

Photo courtesy: Getty

#34. Huntsville, Ala.

Risk level: 3.94

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 441,086

Photo courtesy: Getty

#33. Shreveport, La.

Risk level: 3.95

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 445,142

Photo courtesy: Getty

#32. Fayetteville, Ark.

Risk level: 3.97

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 501,653

Photo courtesy: Getty

#31. Jackson, Miss.

Risk level: 4

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 577,564

Photo courtesy: Getty

#30. Augusta, Ga.

Risk level: 4

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 583,632

Photo courtesy: Getty

#29. Little Rock, Ark.

Risk level: 4.24

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 729,135

Photo courtesy: Getty

#28. Columbia, SC

Risk level: 4.36

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 800,495

Photo courtesy: Getty

#27. Birmingham, Ala.

Risk level: 4.93

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,143,772

Photo courtesy: Getty

#26. Raleigh, NC

Risk level: 5.09

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,242,974

Photo courtesy: Getty

#25. Richmond, Va.

Risk level: 5.12

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,260,029

Photo courtesy: Getty

#24. Louisville, Ky.

Risk level: 5.13

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,269,702

Photo courtesy: Getty

#23. Oklahoma City, Okla.

Risk level: 5.25

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,336,767

Photo courtesy: Getty

#22. Memphis, Tenn.

Risk level: 5.26

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,343,230

Photo courtesy: Getty

#21. Nashville, Tenn.

Risk level: 6

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,792,649

Photo courtesy: Getty

#20. Kansas City, Mo.

Risk level: 6.04

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 2,071,133

Photo courtesy: Getty

#19. St. Louis, Mo.

Risk level: 6.13

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 2,806,207

Photo courtesy: Getty

#18. Dallas, Texas

Risk level: 7.11

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 500,000-1,000,000
Population: 6,954,330

Photo courtesy: Getty

#17. Charlotte, NC

Risk level: 7.38

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 2,380,314

Photo courtesy: Getty

#16. Washington, D.C.

Risk level: 7.86

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 6,033,737

Photo courtesy: Getty

#15. Philadelphia, Pa.

Risk level: 7.86

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 10,000-500,000
Population: 6,052,170

Photo courtesy: Getty

#14. Los Angeles, Calif.

Risk level: 7.93

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Low
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 500,000-1,000,000
Population: 13,262,220

Photo courtesy: Getty

#13. Savannah, Ga.

Risk level: 7.99

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 372,708

Photo courtesy: Getty

#12. Tallahassee, Fla.

Risk level: 7.99

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 375,751

Photo courtesy: Getty

#11. Mobile, Ala.

Risk level: 8

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 415,123

Photo courtesy: Getty

#10. Charleston, SC

Risk level: 8

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 727,689

Photo courtesy: Getty

#9. New Orleans, La.

Risk level: 8.01

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,251,849

Photo courtesy: Getty

#8. Atlanta, Ga.

Risk level: 8.13

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 500,000-1,000,000
Population: 5,614,323

Photo courtesy: Getty

#7. Houston, Texas

Risk level: 8.14

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 500,000-1,000,000
Population: 6,490,180

Photo courtesy: Getty

#6. Jacksonville, Fla.

Risk level: 8.38

Mosquito level in January: Low
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 1,419,127

Photo courtesy: Getty

#5. New York, NY

Risk level: 8.49

Mosquito level in January: None
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 1,000,000-2,000,000
Population: 20,092,883

Photo courtesy: Getty

#4. Brownsville, Texas

Risk level: 8.86

Mosquito level in January: Low
Mosquito level in July: Moderate
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 420,392

Photo courtesy: Getty

#3. Tampa, Fla.

Risk level: 9.14

Mosquito level in January: Low
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: <10,000
Population: 2,915,582

Photo courtesy: Getty

#2. Orlando, Fla.

Risk level: 9.43

Mosquito level in January: Low
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 500,000-1,000,000
Population: 2,321,418

Photo courtesy: Getty

#1. Miami, Fla.

Risk level: 10

Mosquito level in January: Moderate
Mosquito level in July: High
Number of people traveling to the U.S. from Zika countries: 1,000,000-2,000,000
Population: 5,929,819

Photo courtesy: Getty

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Florida on Friday said the first four cases of Zika in the state likely were caused by mosquitoes, the first sign that the virus is circulating locally, although it has yet to identify mosquitoes carrying the disease.

Scott said in a statement the 10 new cases of Zika also were likely caused by the bite of a local mosquito.

The Florida Department of Health said six of the 10 new cases are asymptomatic and were identified through the door-to-door community survey and testing that it is conducting.

The health department said it believes active transmission of Zika is restricted to 1 square-mile (2.6 square km) area in Miami-Dade County, just north of downtown Miami.

The state health department has been testing individuals in three locations in Miami-Dade and Broward counties for possible local transmissions through mosquito bites. Based on its investigations, two locations have been ruled out for possible local transmission of Zika.

The current Zika outbreak was first detected last year in Brazil, where it has been linked to more than 1,700 cases of the birth defect microcephaly, and has since spread rapidly through the Americas.

Scott said women who live within the impacted area and are either pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant should contact their doctor for guidance and to receive a Zika prevention kit. (Reporting by Julie Steenhuysen; Editing by Bill Trott)

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