Ukraine announces new plans for site of Chernobyl disaster

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Chernobyl May Produce Energy Again, but This Time It Will Be Clean

Chernobyl's wasteland could soon turn into a huge solar energy farm.

The land is considered too dangerous for people to live on or farm, but the lack of human activity has allowed wildlife in the area to flourish.

Now, the Ukrainian government said the land could be used to generate more than 1,000 milliwatts of solar energy.

The government says the area is well-suited for solar energy, and it can rely on transmission lines left over from the nuclear plant to feed energy onto the national grid.

Pripyat, Ukraine 30 Years after Chernobyl:

31 PHOTOS
Pripyat, Ukraine 30 Years after Chernobyl
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Pripyat, Ukraine 30 Years after Chernobyl
A view of an amusement park in the centre of the abandoned town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
Toys are left in a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A doll in a children's gas mask is seen amongst beds at a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
The coat of arms of the former Soviet Union is seen on the roof of a house in the abandoned city of Pripyat near Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A doll is seen amongst beds at a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Ferris Wheel is seen in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of an amusement park in the centre of the abandoned town of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A house is seen in the abandoned village of Zalesye near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
? baby cot is seen in a house in the abandoned village of Zalesye near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A portrait is seen in a house in the abandoned village of Zalesye near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A portrait is seen in a house in the abandoned village of Zalesye near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
The coat of arms of the former Soviet Union is seen on the roof of a house in the abandoned city of Pripyat near Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
The coat of arms of the former Soviet Union is seen on the roof of a house in the abandoned city of Pripyat near Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A picture of Soviet state founder Vladimir Lenin is seen in a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A shoe for children is left in a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A cat is seen in front of a ferris wheel in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A ferris wheel is seen in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
An interior view of a building in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
An interior view of a building in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
Employees ride a bus in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
Employees work in front of the sarcophagus covering the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
Containers are seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A guard is seen at a checkpoint in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view of the abandoned city of Pripyat is seen near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
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All told, there is more than 23 square miles of land that isn't being used.

There are at least six companies already interested in the project, and Ukraine hopes to install 4 megawatts of panels by the end of the year.

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development is also considering investing. That bank has already put about $500 million into constructing a massive, stainless steel shield for the damaged nuclear reactor.

The project could help Ukraine become less dependent on Russia for its energy needs. The country heavily relies on natural gas from Russia, but it's recently been trying to find alternatives to that deal.

Tensions are high between the neighboring countries. Russian-backed rebels invaded an eastern Ukrainian territory in 2014. The two sides are currently in an uneasy cease-fire.

Returning to Chernobyl:

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Returning to Chernobyl
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Returning to Chernobyl
Olga Korolova, 39, poses for a photograph in her flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An undated family photograph shows Olga Korolova (R) before the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A lamp hangs in a flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Oleksiy Yermakov, 41, poses for a photograph in his flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 5, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An undated photograph shows Oleksiy Yermakov (L) before the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Rusty lids of jars are scattered across the top of a broken cupboard in a flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Zoya Perevozchenko, 66, poses for a photograph in her house which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 5, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An undated photograph shows Zoya Perevozchenko (R) before the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Nikolay Chernyavskiy, 66, poses for a photograph in his flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An undated family photograph shows Nikolay Chernyavskiy and his wife Tatyana before the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Elena Kupriyanova, 42, poses for a photograph in her flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 5, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An undated family photograph shows Elena Kupriyanova (2nd L) and Valentina Yermakova (R) before the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE. SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
The handle of a window and a dead butterfly lie on a windowsill in a flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Roman Chernyavskiy, 32, poses for a photograph in his flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Mailboxes are seen in an apartment which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Tatyana Chernyavskaya, 65, poses for a photograph in her flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A New Year decoration is seen in a house which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
The number of an apartment is seen in a flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
An electricity socket is seen in a flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Moss is seen growing on a child's slipper in the ghost town of Pripyat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
A toy is seen in a flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Valentina Yermakova, 64, poses for a photograph in her flat which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 5, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Trees stand outside a window of an apartment which was evacuated after an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, in the ghost town of Pripyat, Ukraine April 18, 2016. For residents of Chernobyl, a three-day evacuation turned into a thirty-year exile. Returning to their hometown of Pripyat on the eve of the anniversary, they recall their confusion and sacrifice in the wake of the world's worst nuclear accident. In the morning of April 26, 1986, one couldn't immediately tell that a meltdown in reactor 4 of the nuclear plant in then-Soviet Ukraine was poisoning the air with deadly radioactive particles. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich SEARCH "RETURN PRIPYAT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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