This $3.2M Flintstone house is a blast from the past

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Flintstones house
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Flintstones house
Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors
Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

Photo credit: Alain Pinel Realtors

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If the launch of the Pokémon Go app didn't give you serious nostalgia vibes, then this house certainly will.

Nestled in the suburbs of Hillsborough, California, the unique house has gained major attention on social media. Many have dubbed the creatively constructed home the "Flintstone House" due to its striking resemblance to the iconic home from the hit TV show "The Flintstones." Neighbors have also called the home The Dome House and The Marshmallow House.

SEE ALSO: Go fishin' in this Oklahoma home built in the shape of a fishing reel

The home was originally built in 1976, and while many think the architect created the home to resemble its famous doppelganger, he actually had other plans. It's creator, William Nicholson, was inspired by the "monolithic dome construction," a technique invented in 1975 by the South Brothers in Shelley, Idaho.

As popular as the home has become on social media, not everyone is a fan. Some neighbors have called it an eyesore, largely due to the current owners painting the home orange and purple.

The house is currently on the market, and if prehistoric-themed homes are your style, you can buy it for a cool $3.195 million.

Check out the photos above of the eccentric home.

Now discover some of the strangest homes in the world:
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