Hillary Clinton will declare the country is at a 'moment of reckoning' in acceptance speech

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Hillary Clinton set to make history Thursday night

Hillary Clinton will ask the American people to "decide whether we're going to work together so we can all rise together," during her historic nomination acceptance speech.

The former secretary of state will make history inside the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on Thursday, becoming the first female to be nominated by a major political party in United States history.

In excerpts released by the Clinton campaign, the Democratic nominee will also address the recent acts of violence from around world, laying out a clear distinction between her plans and the plans of her rival Republican nominee Donald Trump.

"America is once again at a moment of reckoning. Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart. Bonds of trust and respect are fraying. And just as with our founders there are no guarantees. It's truly is up to us. We have to decide whether we're going to work together so we can all rise together."

Click through images of Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama at the DNC:

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Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama at the DNC
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Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama at the DNC
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton wave to the crowd after the President spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton hugs U.S. President Barack Obama as she arrives onstage at the end of his speech on the third night of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young 
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton hugs U.S. President Barack Obama as she arrives onstage at the end of his speech on the third night of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets U.S. President Barack Obama as she arrives onstage at the end of his speech on the third night of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets U.S. President Barack Obama as she arrives onstage at the end of his speech on the third night of the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
U.S. President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear onstage together after his speech on the third night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
U.S. President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear onstage together after his speech on the third night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear onstage together after his speech on the third night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton joins U.S. President Barack Obama onstage after his remarks on the third night of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear onstage together after his speech on the third night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President Barack Obama and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton appear onstage together after his speech on the third night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
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Some Republicans have criticized many of the speakers during the Democratic National Convention for the lack of time spent addressing the threat of terrorism. However, it appears Clinton will address these concerns head-on during her speech Thursday night.

"Anyone reading the news can see the threats and turbulence we face. From Baghdad and Kabul, to Nice and Paris and Brussels, to San Bernardino and Orlando, we're dealing with determined enemies that must be defeated. No wonder people are anxious and looking for reassurance -- looking for steady leadership."

Read the prepared remarks released ahead of Clinton's speech below:

"America is once again at a moment of reckoning. Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart. Bonds of trust and respect are fraying. And just as with our founders there are no guarantees. It's truly is up to us. We have to decide whether we're going to work together so we can all rise together.

"We are clear-eyed about what our country is up against. But we are not afraid. We will rise to the challenge, just as we always have.

"So I want to tell you tonight how we're going to empower all Americans to live better lives. My primary mission as President will be to create more opportunity and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States. From my first day in office to my last. Especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind. From our inner cities to our small towns, Indian Country to Coal Country. From the industrial Midwest to the Mississippi Delta to the Rio Grande Valley.

"The choice we face is just as stark when it comes to our national security. Anyone reading the news can see the threats and turbulence we face. From Baghdad and Kabul, to Nice and Paris and Brussels, to San Bernardino and Orlando, we're dealing with determined enemies that must be defeated. No wonder people are anxious and looking for reassurance -- looking for steady leadership.

"Every generation of Americans has come together to make our country freer, fairer, and stronger. None of us can do it alone. That's why we are stronger together."

BY: WILLIAM STEAKIN

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