Sanders supporters stage walkout after Clinton officially nominated: 'She will never get my vote'

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Sanders supporters stage walkout after Clinton officially nominated

A crowd of delegates walked out of the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday in protest, storming the media tent and staging a sit-in moments after Hillary Clinton was officially declared the party's presidential nominee.

Shortly after Clinton crossed the delegate threshold, it was announced that the former secretary of state was officially the first female presidential nominee of a major political party. Dozens of delegates quickly marched out of the Wells Fargo Center while chanting "the world is watching," and "this is what democracy looks like."

Protesters placed tape over their mouths that read, "the DNC silenced me," and "solidarity." Some demonstrators carried signs reading "this is what a stolen election looks like," "Bernie or Bust," and "the Democratic party just elected Donald Trump."

"She will never get my vote."

The scene was an emotional one, with one delegate breaking into tears while discussing why she decided to walk out of the convention.

Indiana delegate Dianne Salazar talked with tears in her eyes about how Bernie Sanders' ran a campaign that was unlike any other that she has seen.

"He ran a candidacy that was just above reproach in every way, and it saddens us greatly to see what happened today. We love him because he was the kind of person that walked the talk his entire life. Today our hearts are broken," Salazar said.

Click through images from the protest:

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DNC Media Tent Protest
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DNC Media Tent Protest
A supporter of Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, holds a sign reading 'Actions Speak Louder Than Words' while demonstrating inside the media tent during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, hold signs while demonstrating inside the media tent during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Republican nominee Donald Trump appears on a monitor as supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., stage a sit-in of the media tents after walking out of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa., on the second day of the Democratic National Convention, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
A supporter of Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, holds a sign reading 'A Vote For Hilary Is A Vote For Trump' while demonstrating outside the media tent during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, touch hands through the glass of the media tent while demonstrating during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, wears a sticker over her mouth while demonstrating outside the media tent during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., stage a sit-in of the media tent after walking out of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa., on the second day of the Democratic National Convention, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Bernie Sanders delegates and supporters stage a walk out and protest at the media tents outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26: Police watch protesters near the Wells Fargo Center on the second day of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) on July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The convention is expected to attract thousands of protesters, members of the media and Democratic delegates to the City of Brotherly Love. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26: Police watch protesters near the Wells Fargo Center on the second day of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) on July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The convention is expected to attract thousands of protesters, members of the media and Democratic delegates to the City of Brotherly Love. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Delegates protest in the media filing center as they walk out of the convention floor during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Delegates walk out of the convention as they protest in the media filing center during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Delegates walk out of the convention as they protest during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Delegates protest in the media filing center as they walk out of the convention floor during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Delegates walk out of the convention as they protest during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Delegates protest in the media filing center as they walk out of the convention floor during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Delegates protest in the media filing center as they walk out of the convention floor during the second day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
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When asked if she would support Clinton in November, now that the former first lady was officially the Democratic nominee, Salazar offered a blunt response. "She will never get my vote."

"It's not because I don't want a women president, it's not that I don't respect the presidency, or the Democratic party, it's because she is not the women that we should have put up. She is not the candidate of our times. We have to have a new way of thinking."

Hawaii delegate Petra Halperin, who also walked out, says she feels she was let down by Sanders when he endorsed Clinton for president. "I am disappointed," Halperin said.

"Bernie, in my opinion, could have taken a stand and taken in these millions of people with him." Halperin continued, "I'm disappointed he's not endorsing Jill," referring to Green Party nominee Jill Stein.

Alex Davis, a Sanders delegate from Ohio said "I don't care" when asked about Sanders backing Clinton. For Davis the movement that Sanders started is ultimately bigger than Sanders himself. "Bernie Sanders tried to get us to vote for Clinton, but Bernie Sanders told us this movement is bigger than him and we took him seriously."

"It's about us not him," said Davis.

BY: WILLIAM STEAKIN

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