Japan alleged mass murderer: 'All disabled should cease to exist'

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Japan Alleged Mass Murderer Caught on Security Camera

TOKYO — The suspect in the stabbing deaths of 19 people at a facility for the disabled in Japan was hospitalized just months ago after writing a letter saying "all disabled should cease to exist," a local official told NBC News.

According to the Kyodo news service, alleged killer Satoshi Uematsu threatened an attack almost identical to the one carried out on Tuesday.

Shinya Sakuma, director of health and welfare for Kanagawa Prefecture, told reporters during a news conference that Uematsu was a former employee at the facility.

Shortly after 2 a.m. Tuesday (3 p.m. Monday ET), Uematsu entered the site by breaking a window. He then tied up a staff member, stole a set of keys and then began stabbing residents, Sakuma said.

In addition to the 19 people fatally stabbed, 25 others were wounded.

Uematsu later turned himself into police in Sagamihara, which is around 25 miles west of Tokyo.

Photos of the incident:

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This general view shows Kitazato University hospital after 13 injured people were brought from the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists await outside Kitazato University hospital after 13 injured people were brought from the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
A TV reporter explains the situation near the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
A police officer stands guard at the gate of the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades.(TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
Two ambulances wait at the entrance of Kitazato University hospital after 13 injured people were brought from the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists await outside Kitazato University hospital after 13 injured people were brought from the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists await outside Kitazato University hospital after 13 injured people were brought from the Tsukui Yamayuri En care centre where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture on July 26, 2016. At least 19 people died on July 26 when a knife-wielding man went on the rampage at a Japanese care centre for the mentally disabled, the country's worst mass killing in decades. (TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
A police officer stands guard in front of a facility for the disabled, where a deadly attack by a knife-wielding man took place, in Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Issei Kato
Media members try to report in front of a facility for the disabled, where a deadly attack by a knife-wielding man took place, in Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Issei Kato
A facility for the disabled (L), where a deadly attack by a knife-wielding man took place, is seen in Sagamihara, Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Issei Kato
Police investigators work at the Tsukui Yamayuri-en, a facility for the disabled where a number of people were killed and dozens injured in a knife attack in Sagamihara, outside Tokyo Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Police said they responded to a call at about 2:30 a.m. from an employee saying something horrible was happening at the facility in the city of Sagamihara, 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Tokyo. A man turned himself in at a police station about two hours later, police said.(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
SAGAMIHARA, JAPAN - JULY 26: Media members gather in front of Tsukui Yamayuri En care home on July 26, 2016 in Sagamihara, Japan. Nineteen people are dead and 26 others wounded after an attack by a man with a knife at Tsukui Yamayuri En (Tsukui Lily Garden), a care facility for the disabled in Japan early on July 26, 2016. The man, Satoshi Uematsu, already has turned himself into the near-by police station. (Photo by Ken Ishii/Getty Images)
SAGAMIHARA, JAPAN - JULY 26: Media members gather in front of Tsukui Yamayuri En care home on July 26, 2016 in Sagamihara, Japan. Nineteen people are dead and 26 others wounded after an attack by a man with a knife at Tsukui Yamayuri En (Tsukui Lily Garden), a care facility for the disabled in Japan early on July 26, 2016. The man, Satoshi Uematsu, already has turned himself into the near-by police station. (Photo by Ken Ishii/Getty Images)
SAGAMIHARA, JAPAN - JULY 26: Police officers investigate at Tsukui Yamayuri En care home on July 26, 2016 in Sagamihara, Japan. Nineteen people are dead and 26 others wounded after an attack by a man with a knife at a care facility for the disabled in Japan early on July 26, 2016. The man, Satoshi Uematsu, already has turned himself into the near-by police station. (Photo by Ken Ishii/Getty Images)
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The Kyodo news service published a letter that it reported had been delivered by Uematsu to the office of Japanese lawmaker Tadamori Oshima on Feb. 15. According to the report, Uematsu said that he planned to "wipe out" 470 disabled people. The site he targeted houses about 160 people.

"I envision a world where a person with multiple disabilities can be euthanized, with an agreement from the guardians, when it is difficult for the person to carry out household and social activities," the letter reportedly said. "Now is the time to carry out a revolution and make an inevitable but tough decision for the sake of all mankind."

It added: "I believe there is still no answer about the way of life for individuals with multiple disabilities. The disabled can only create misery."

Killing the disabled would stimulate the world economy and maybe even prevent a World War III, Kyodo reported that the letter said.

It also described detailed plans for a nighttime attack when there were few staff working, with Uematsu adding he would turn himself into police afterwards.

The manifesto prompted the local police and health officials to get involved, a local mental health official told NBC News. On Feb. 19, Uematsu was committed to a psychiatric facility.

During his time under treatment, Uematsu tested positive for marijuana use, according to the spokesperson.

He was released on March 2 after doctors concluded he was no longer a danger to himself and others.

Tuesday's incident was the deadliest mass killing in the country since the end of World War II.

More on the tragic story:

At least 15 dead in Japan stabbing rampage

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