Hillary Clinton makes history as she is formally named Democratic presidential candidate

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Hillary Clinton Formally Nominated As Democratic Presidential Nominee

Hillary Clinton cemented her place in history amid a tense Democratic convention in Philadelphia Tuesday when delegates formally made her the nation's first female presidential nominee for a major political party during a roll call vote.

The delegation from South Dakota cast the history-making votes that pushed Clinton over the 2,383 delegate threshold she needed to become the nominee.

While there were some protesting Clinton's nomination, the delegates in the hall were significantly less boisterous than they were on Monday, when supporters of Bernie Sanders repeatedly broke out in protest cheers and occasionally some boos when Clinton's name was discussed.

See photos of the second night of the convention and the colorful nominating process:

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DNC night 2
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DNC night 2
An attendee covers his mouth in protest at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA) takes the podium to nominate Hillary Clinton during the second day at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
A staff member holds the delegate vote count for Alabama at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking.
Delegates hold a U.S. flag as they cheer during the second day at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe (L) and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio embrace onstage during the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Former Democratic Presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (L) sits with former NAACP President Benjamin Jealous during the roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A man carries a cardboard cutout of the face of U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
The Florida delegation wave at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking.
A delegate holds up a sign reading "Election Fraud" during a speech nominating former Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders on the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) delivers a nomination speech for Senator Bernie Sanders on the second day at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) gestures after nominating Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
An assortment of buttons are seen on a delegates hat at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
Actresses Lena Dunham (L) and America Fererra speak during the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 26, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Famous faces at the Democratic National Convention.
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JULY 26: Donna Brazile, Democratic National Committee Vice Chair of Voter Registration and Participation addresses the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
The silhouettes of photographers are seen as Hillary Clinton, 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, speaks on screen during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Actress Meryl Streep speaks at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Alicia Keys performs at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Madeleine Albright, former Secretary of State, speaks during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
9/11 Survivor Lauren Manning speaks during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Singer Andra Day performs at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Actors Lena Dunham, left, and America Fererra speak during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Mothers of the Movement, those who have lost children to police violence, take the stage at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Actor Tony Goldwyn speaks during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Democrats began their presidential nominating convention Monday with a struggle to fully unite the party, following a dramatic day of internal squabbling and protests. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Sanders took the helm at the end of the roll call after Clinton had crossed the threshold, as he officially moved for Clinton to be selected as the nominee of the Democratic Party.

The roll call vote was a departure from the 2008 nominating convention, where Clinton moved to waive the public roll call and allow her former rival Barack Obama to be nominated by a voice vote. Tuesday night's vote gave dismayed Sanders supporters an opportunity to publicly voice their support for the candidate.

The proceedings began with Rep. Tulsi Gabbard giving an impassioned speech on Sanders' behalf, formally nominating him for president and championing the progressive movement he sparked.

"This movement of love and compassion is bigger than anyone of us," she declared.

Trailblazers Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who made Senate history, and civil rights hero Rep. John Lewis helped formally place Clinton's name into the nomination process. Their speeches included passionate testaments both to Clinton and to the historic role she plays as the first female Democratic nominee for president -- and potentially first to serve in the Oval Office.

Mikulski also focused on Clinton's intense work ethic.

"Some people want to rant. Hillary wants to get results," the senator said. "She'll work hard for you. She'll fight for your day-to-day needs and the long-range needs of the country. She'll fight for the macro issues and the macaroni and cheese issues. So you'll have national security and economic security. So you will have an opportunity to have a good job in a good neighborhood with a good school. And your kids will have a really good future."

But one of the most emotional moments of the evening came when Larry Sanders, brother to the groundbreaking progressive candidate, spoke as a member of the Americans Abroad delegation about how his parents worked hard and died too young to see their son's movement take shape.

"They would be immensely proud of their son and his accomplishments. They loved him," he said.

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