Disturbing video shows what your lungs look like after smoking 20 cigarettes

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
This is What Your Lungs Look Like After 20 Cigarettes

It's not exactly a secret that smoking can shave years off your life.

But researchers at the University of Bristol actually sat down and figured out exactly how much time one cigarette shortens your life by.

The answer? 11 whole minutes.

The study, published in the U.S. National Institutes of Health's National Library of Medicine, took into account, "the difference in life expectancy between male smokers and non-smokers and an estimate of the total number of cigarettes a regular male smoker might consume in his lifetime."

Using data provided by the Office for National Statistics, the researchers found the difference in life expectancy between smokers and non-smokers to be 6.5 years.

They then calculated that if a man smokes the average number of 5,772 cigarettes a year from the median starting age of 17 until his death at the age of 71, he will consume a total of 311,688 cigarettes in his lifetime.

Assuming that each cigarette makes the same contribution to said male's death, each cigarette has cost him, on average, 11 minutes of life:

6.5 years = 2,374 days and 56,976 hours, or 3,418,560 minutes

5,772 cigarettes per year for 54 years = 311,688 cigarettes

3,418,560/311,688=11 minutes per cigarette.

As if that statistic wasn't terrifying enough, MEDspiration took to their Facebook page to augment the study with a video illustrating exactly what a healthy pair of lungs looks like after smoking just 20 cigarettes.

Be forewarned -- it's disturbing.

"In this video, we watch as a group of medical student's feed a healthy pair of lungs 20 cigarettes (a pack of Marlboro menthol)," they wrote. "Following administration of the 20 cigarettes, we can clearly analyze that tar build up in the trachea & discoloration of the lung has already set in!"

While the study is admittedly crude in nature -- it relies on averages, assumes that the health effects of smoking are evenly spread throughout a smoker's lifetime, presumes that the number of cigarettes smoked throughout a lifetime is constant and ignores the difficulties in classifying people as either lifetime smokers or non-smokers -- we must admit, they both show the high cost of smoking in a way that everyone can understand.

RELATED: Check out photos of this powerful anti-smoking campaign:

8 PHOTOS
anti smoking campaign
See Gallery
anti smoking campaign
This undated image provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows the federal agency's new ad campaign featuring wrinkled skin and yellow teeth to show the costs associated with cigarette smoking. The federal agency said Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called ?The Real Cost? that?s aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit. Advertisements will run in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. for at least one year beginning Feb. 11. (AP Photo/Food and Drug Administration)
This undated image provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows the federal agency's new ad campaign featuring yellow teeth to show the costs associated with cigarette smoking. The federal agency said Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called ?The Real Cost? that?s aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit. Advertisements will run in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. for at least one year beginning Feb. 11. (AP Photo/Food and Drug Administration)
This combination of images provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows posters from their anti-smoking advertising campaign, launched on Thursday, March 28, 2013. The ads are part of the second round of a graphic ad campaign designed to get smokers off tobacco. The CDC says they believe the last effort convinced tens of thousands to quit. (AP Photo/CDC)
This image provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a poster from their anti-smoking advertising campaign, launched on Thursday, March 28, 2013. The ad is part of the second round of a graphic ad campaign designed to get smokers off tobacco. The CDC says they believe the last effort convinced tens of thousands to quit. (AP Photo/CDC)
The California Department of Health Services launched the first wave of their 1997 advertising campaign by unveiling a package of hard-hitting anti-tobacco ads, such as this billboard, at a news conference at the State Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., on Thursday, March 20, 1997. The new advertising will be released on Monday, March 24. (AP Photo/ho)
A cigarette ad from the 1950s is shown in 1987, when the ad was used in a liability suit against Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., to prove the company had used such ads when they allegedly knew that smoking had harmful physical health effects, according to anti-smoking advocates. (AP Photo)
A cigarette ad from the 1950s is shown in 1987, when the ad was used in a liability suit against Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., to prove the company had used such ads when they allegedly knew that smoking had harmful physical health effects, according to anti-smoking advocates. (AP Photo)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners