Republicans chanted 'lock her up' at the RNC, but what do delegates really think?

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Republicans at the RNC weigh in on 'lock her up' chant

BY: WILLIAM STEAKIN

Throughout the Republican National Convention the atmosphere seemed to fluctuate between celebration and hostility.

Republican delegates from across the country packed the Quicken Loans Arena in downtown Cleveland for four straight nights. The largely red, white, and blue clad crowd could be seen dancing in the isles as the in house band played one moment and calling for presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton to be locked up in the next.

However, Republicans in Cleveland seem divided on fully embracing the more antagonistic forms of politics that have emerged during the 2016 campaign, with some GOPers claiming it could be detrimental to their cause in the general election.

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A delegate studies a copy of the Republican platform document that reflect the policies of the Republican Party that will be voted on at the RNC, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli sneaks in a quick hot dog on the floor of the Republican National Convention as he discusses a controversial fight over the RNC rules with a delegate (R) at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Oregon alternate RNC delegate Nathan Dahlin wears an assortment of political buttons at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
A vendor shows off Donald Trump t-shirts for sale at one of the RNC Convention Stores inside the arena selling goods to delegates at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk
Delegates hold a campaign sign for Donald Trump, presumptive 2016 Republican presidential nominee, during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: John Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A delegate attends the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Delegates react to a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Diana Shores from Farmville, VA (C) protests a roll call vote on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A delegate in patriotic dress on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as its presidential nominee. Some 2,000 delegates descended on a tightly secured Cleveland arena where Trump's wife will take center stage later in the day to make a personal pitch to voters that her billionaire husband is the best candidate for the White House. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A delegate wear an American flag cowboy hat while waiting at a food stand during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli (2nd L) along with other delegates from Virginia chant for a rule call vote on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
A delegate on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as its presidential nominee. Some 2,000 delegates descended on a tightly secured Cleveland arena where Trump's wife will take center stage later in the day to make a personal pitch to voters that her billionaire husband is the best candidate for the White House. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A Wisconsin delegate on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A delegate holds a campaign bumper sticker for Donald Trump, presumptive 2016 Republican presidential nominee, during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Shoes worn by a delegate on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as its presidential nominee. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert 'Mike' Duncan, former chairman of the Republican National Committee, speaks during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Delegates react to a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) speaks during the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
Delegates react to a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
A delegate protests a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
A delegate protests a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates from Texas wave their hats in the air on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A Florida delegate poses for the media on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
A delegate gets a picture taken with a Trump supporter on the floor on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegate Beverly Gossage of Eudora, KS attends the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Delegates on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Sen. Pat Roberts (R-KS) gestures as he speaks on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Tennesee Delegate Nate Mitchell sports a coonskin hat on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Delegates on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Alexandra smith, national chairman of the College Republican National Committee, smiles during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Linda Lingle, former governor of Hawaii, smile during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Kimberly Yee, a Republican from Arizona, speaks during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Matt Walter, president of the State Leadership Committee, gestures while speaking during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A delegate takes a selfie in front of a banner in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Bill Schuette, Michigan attorney general, speaks during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Bob Little, delegate from Michigan salutes during the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Larry Householder, former speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives, speaks during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Jeff Larson, CEO of the Republican National Convention, speaks on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Delegates speak during the Republican National Convention (RNC) in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., on Monday, July 18, 2016. The day before the start of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Reince Priebus said Donald Trump has to use the gathering to convince Americans he can be presidential. Photographer: John Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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"It's not the sort of thing that's going to convince unaffiliated voters to vote for our ticket," said Colorado delegate Dan Green. Speaking with AOL News, Green described his disappointment with the convention, calling it a "missed opportunity."

"We had a chance here to talk about a conservative philosophy of government and we missed it." Instead, Green said, the convention was filled with "a lot of anti-Hillary screed."

When asked about Trump's veteran affairs adviser Al Baldasaro's recent comments that Clinton should be "shot for treason," Green called the statement "awful."

"I don't think it respects our values as a party," Green continued. "It's not what we are about. That's the Trump campaign speaking and that's emblematic of the bullying that they've engaged in from the beginning of their campaign.

"Trump is just dividing us. He is destroying the party, and I'll never vote for him for that reason."

However, even presidential nominee Donald Trump seemed to distance himself from the controversial refrain, offering up to the chorus of "lock her up" chants that erupted in the Quicken Loans Arena during his speech an alternative direction to focus their enthusiasm; "let's defeat her," said Trump.

For other Republicans the debate over whether or not Clinton should be arrested is a bit more complicated than the "lock her up" catch phrase may imply.

RNC attendee and United States Marine Corps veteran Laura Licata explained that before hearing FBI Director James Comey's ruling, which suggested Clinton not be prosecuted for her email servers, she believed Clinton should "absolutely be thrown in prison."

But following Comey's statement Licata accepted the director's opinion while also acknowledging that, "different laws and statutes need to be rewritten so that people that can hide behind their relationships can be arrested."

Mike Lachs, with the New Jersey delegation, wearing a "Hillary for prison" button along with an large elephant headdress in support of the GOP, said that Clinton "definitely committed a crime," however Lachs stated "it's not my job to decide, I'm not a lawyer, I'm not a judge," when he was pushed on if Clinton should actually face jail time.

Another RNC visitor named Curt Braden, a local Ohioan, feels Clinton "isn't innocent of anything," yet downplayed the calls for her imprisonment, claiming the chants were just "kind of the choice expression for the rally of the point right now."

When asked about Baldasaro's call for Clinton to be shot for treason, Braden said "I think once the case is adjudicated than a jury of her peers will make the decision on exactly what will take place.

"That's why we're here. It's Democracy."

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