3 US states plan lawsuits over Volkswagen diesel pollution

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Volkswagen Settlement to Cost Almost $15 Billion

WASHINGTON, July 18 (Reuters) - Three U.S. states plan to unveil new lawsuits against Volkswagen AG on Tuesday tied to the automaker's sale of diesel vehicles that had software allowing pollution emissions of up to 40 times legally allowable limits.

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Volkswagen emissions scandal
The Oct. 5, 2015 photo shows a man sitting on a bench in front of the Volkswagen factories in Wolfsburg, northern Germany. For Volkswagen, the cost of its cheating on emissions tests in the U.S. is likely to run into the tens of billions of dollars and prematurely end its long-sought status as the world's biggest carmaker. (Julian Stratenschulte/dpa via AP)
FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2015 file photo President and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. Michael Horn at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York. Volkswagen's top U.S.-based executive is expected to testify before Congress Thursday that he first learned in 2014 of emissions problems with the German automaker's diesel cars. But in prepared remarks, Volkswagen Group of America CEO Michael Horn doesn't directly address when he was first told his company had developed on-board computer software designed to deceive emissions tests. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)
Hans Dieter Poetsch, new chairman of the board of directors of the Volkswagen stock company, arrives for a press statement at the company headquarter in Wolfsburg, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. He fills a position vacated when longtime chairman Ferdinand Piech resigned in April. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
This photo taken on Sept. 29, 2015 shows the power plant of the Volkswagen factory in the city Wolfsburg, Germany. Thanks to Volkswagen, Wolfsburg boomed in West Germanyâs postwar rebirth and today the town and the company are inseparable. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
This photo taken on Sept. 29, 2015 shows the power plant of the Volkswagen factory and the Science Center, right, in the city Wolfsburg, Germany. Thanks to Volkswagen, Wolfsburg boomed in West Germanyâs postwar rebirth and today the town and the company are inseparable. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
In this Sept. 30, 2015, photo, John Swanton, spokesman with the California Air Resources Board explains how a 2013 Volkswagen Passat with a diesel engine is evaluated at the emissions test lab in El Monte, Calif. Three years after Volkswagen opened a pollution testing center in Oxnard, Calif., VW admitted that it manipulated emissions results in 482,000 U.S. diesel vehicles to make them appear to run cleaner, raising questions around Volkswagenâs only test center in North America. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)
New cars of the German car manufacturer Volkswagen are ready to be shipped at the Volkswagen factory in Emden, Germany, Sept. 30, 2015. (Ingo Wagner, dpa via AP)
This Sept. 28, 2015 photo shows Volkswagenâs only test center in North America in Oxnard, Calif. Three years after Volkswagen opened the pollution testing center, VW admitted that it manipulated emissions results in 482,000 U.S. diesel vehicles to make them appear to run cleaner, raising questions around Volkswagenâs only test center in North America. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Newly appointed Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller smiles during a press statement after a meeting of Volkswagen's supervisory board in Wolfsburg, Germany, Friday, Sept. 25, 2015, after CEO Martin Winterkorn resigned on Wednesday amid an emissions scandal. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)
RETRANSMITS graphic that moved Oct. 3; graphic shows vehicles affected by Volkswagen's emissions violations and estimated deaths in the U.S. from the excess pollution; 3c x 5 inches; 146 mm x 127 mm;
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Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh said in a news release that he would disclose details of the Volkswagen suit on Tuesday. New York state and Massachusetts are filing separate lawsuits related to the same issue, according to a source.

New York state said last month it had reached a "partial settlement" with the automaker - joined by 43 other states - worth a total of $603 million. (Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Paul Simao)

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