Rudy Giuliani brings the house down at RNC

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Giuliani offers support for police officers, first responders

Rudy Giuliani delivered a rousing speech on the opening night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on Monday. The former New York City mayor offered a fiery message to terrorists that brought the convention floor to its feet.

"You know who you are, and we're coming to get you," said Giuliani.

The theme for night one of the convention was "Make America Safe Again," and Giuliani pushed for a more clear label for the United States' enemies. "We must not be afraid to define our enemy,' Giuliani said. "It is Islamic extremist terrorism."

Click through images from the RNC here:

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Chaos at the Republican National Convention
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Chaos at the Republican National Convention
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates from Texas oppose a roll call vote on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Republican National Convention delegates yell and scream as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A Donald Trump-supporting delegate cheers while holding a Trump banner as the Republican National Convention Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest onm the floor on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Delegates react to a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Anti-Trump activists march in protest outside the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as its presidential nominee. / AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli (L) along with other delegates from Virginia chant for a rule call vote on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
An opponent of the Republican National Convention Rules Committee's report and rules changes screams as the Republican party tries to repel the efforts of anti-Trump forces by refusing to hold a roll-call vote on the report and changes, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican National Convention delegates yell and scream as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A Republican National Convention delegates yells as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
An opponent of the Republican National Convention Rules Committee's report and rules changes screams as the Republican party tries to repel the efforts of anti-Trump forces by refusing to hold a roll-call vote on the report and changes, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A Republican National Convention delegate cheers as others yell and scream as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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"This is why our enemies see us as weak and vulnerable," Giuliani said. "Donald Trump said the first step to defeating our enemies is to identify them properly and to identify the connections between them so we can see them and catch them."

The former mayor also said he fixed up New York City during his time as mayor, and promised Trump would do the same for the country if elected president in November.

"I know we can change it, because I did it by changing New York City from the crime capital of America to the safest large city in the United States. What I did for New York, Donald Trump will do for America," Giuliani said.

Giuliani said that Trump is "a man with a big heart," and revealed that the billionaire businessman made anonymous donations to help police officers and firefighters, including after the terror attacks on 9/11.

"I am sick and tired of the defamation of Donald Trump by the Clinton campaign," Giuliani said regarding the onslaught of negativity coming from Trump's Democratic opponent. "I am sick and tired of it. This is a good man. And America should be sick and tired of this vicious, nasty campaign."

The former mayor earned the loudest reaction of the night when he spoke passionately regarding the issue of the police. Giuliani said, "when they come to save your life they don't ask if you're black or white, they just save you."

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