A dead volcano in Rome has come back to life

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A Dead Volcano In Rome Has Come Back To Life

Scientists are saying a dormant volcano on the outskirts of Rome is poised for an eruption. However, this may not occur for a number of years.

Researchers were stunned after they discovered Colli Albani, a volcano that was presumed extinct, is active once again.

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This comes after a new report showed new steam vents, earthquakes and a rise in hill level in surrounding areas leads.

Studies have found the volcano operates in a cycle of a 31,000-year dormancy to eruption period. Colli Albani last erupted 36,000 years ago. Fabrizio Marra, a volcanologist, believes the next eruption could be in 1,000 years.

Scientists are also saying that when the volcano does erupt, it has potential to be equally as destructive as Mount Vesuvius, which caused mass destruction in Pompeii back in 79 A.D.

Marra hopes these findings will serve as a "wake-up call," and encourage fellow scientists to more closely monitor the volcano moving forward.

RELATED: Active fault lines in the United States:

Active fault lines/zones in the United States -- earthquakes
See Gallery
Active fault lines/zones in the United States -- earthquakes

The Alaska-Aleutian Megathrust is located across 3,600 kilometers between Kamchatka, Russia to the Gulf of Alaska.

(Photo by Daniel A. Leifheit via Getty Images)

The Cascadia Megathrust stretches along the coasts of Washington and Oregon up into Canada

(Photo via Encyclopaedia Britannica/UIG via Getty Images)

The Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone runs from Alabama to Virginia and is responsible for four earthquakes in the past century. 

(Photo by Harrison Shull via Getty Images)

The Elsinore Fault Zone lies along the Santa Ana Mountains in Southern California

(Photo handout via NASA)

The Hayward Fault Zone runs along San Francisco Bay for 119 miles.

(Photo by Dave and Les Jacobs via Getty Images)

The Humboldt Fault (red) and the Midcontinent Rift System (green) are both located in Kansas and Nebraska. 

(Photo via Public Domain)

The Independence Valley fault system in Nevada was responsible for the 2008 Wells earthquake. 

(AP Photo/Mike Terry, Deseret Morning News) 

The Laguna Salada Fault runs from the US to Mexico and caused the 2010 Mexicali quake.

(Photo credit should read Daniel CONEJO/AFP/Getty Images)

The Moab Fault is located in Utah.

(By Andrew Wilson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons)

The New Madrid Fault Zone is located in Missouri.

(Photo via Public Domain)

The San Andreas Fault System runs along 1,300 kilometers in California. 


The Wilzetta Fault in Oklahoma is believed to have caused an earthquake in 2011. 

(AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)


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