In wake of shootings, North Carolina just made it easier for police to hide camera footage

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NC's New Law To Hide Police Body Cam Footage

Pat McCrory is on a roll: In March, the Republican governor of North Carolina passed the country's most controversial legislation, the widely-panned anti-transgender bill that mandates trans people use public bathrooms corresponding with their gender assigned at birth.

Now, McCrory and lawmakers in the Republican-controlled state legislature have made it easier for police to conceal police-captured camera footage from the public.

The new rules around police body cameras and dashboard cameras puts police chiefs and sheriffs in charge of deciding whether the public may access recorded videos, among other regulations. As he signed the legislation Monday, McCrory heralded the rules as a "necessary balance" between protecting law enforcement and maintaining transparency.

"We have been trying evaluate how we can deal with technology. How can it help us, and how can we work with it so it doesn't also work against our police officers and public safety officials?" McCrory said in a press conference, according to a WRAL-TV report.

In the wake of police shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, North Carolina's move has angered the civil rights community. The deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, last week, were filmed on bystander cell phone video. Sterling's death may have also been captured on police body cameras, which reportedly became dislodged during the scuffle.

RELATED: See photos of protests across the country in wake of the Alton Sterling and Philando Castile shootings

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Protests around country over Alton Sterling, Philando Castile shootings
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Protests around country over Alton Sterling, Philando Castile shootings
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Protestors yell at police from a bridge on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. A protest shut down highway I-94 during a march to commemorate Philando Castile who was killed by police on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Police officers launch smoke bombs and tear gas to clear out protestors who shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Police officers line up to clear out protestors who shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Police officers launch smoke bombs and tear gas to clear out protestors who shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
BATON ROUGE, LA -JULY 09: Protesters lock arms and shout at law enforcement in riot gear on July 9, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Alton Sterling was shot by a police officer in front of the Triple S Food Mart in Baton Rouge on July 5th, leading the Department of Justice to open a civil rights investigation. (Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Protestors shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
BATON ROUGE, LA -JULY 09: Baton Rouge police removed protesters that were arrested on July 9, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Alton Sterling was shot by a police officer in front of the Triple S Food Mart in Baton Rouge on July 5th, leading the Department of Justice to open a civil rights investigation. (Photo by Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: A protestor is held back by another man on shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have happened every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Protestors shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Ph22oto by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: A protestor raises his fist on shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Police line up as protestors shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: A police officer gives commands as protestors shut down highway I-94 on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
ST. PAUL, MN - JULY 09: Protestors raise their hands as police attempt to move them off highway I-94 which they shut down on July 9, 2016 in St. Paul, Minnesota. Protests and marches have occurred every day since the police killing of Philando Castile on June 6, 2016 in Falcon Heights, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
Police arrest activist DeRay McKesson during a protest along Airline Highway, a major road that passes in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters Saturday, July 9, 2016, in Baton Rouge, La. Protesters angry over the fatal shooting of Alton Sterling by two white Baton Rouge police officers rallied Saturday at the convenience store where he was shot, in front of the city's police department and at the state Capitol for another day of demonstrations. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
A man and woman who had an exchange with protesters are arrested Saturday, July 9, 2016, in Baton Rouge, La. People were protesting the shooting death of a black man, Alton Sterling, by two white police officers at a convenience store parking lot last week. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Protesters block Airline Highway, a major road that passes in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters, Saturday, July 9, 2016, as they protest the shooting death of a black man, Alton Sterling, by two white police officers at a convenience store parking lot last week in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Police arrest a man for blocking a road in near the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters Saturday, July 9, 2016, as people protest the shooting death of a black man, Alton Sterling, by two white police officers at a convenience store parking lot last week in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Sherif Deputies ride outside an armored vehicle on Airline Highway, a major road that passes in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters, as they attempt to clear protestors from the road in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. Several hundred protesters continued blocking the road into the night causing police to arrest several people. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Protesters block Airline Highway, a major road that passes in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters, Saturday, July 9, 2016, as they protest the shooting death of a black man, Alton Sterling, by two white police officers at a convenience store parking lot last week in Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Law enforcement form a line across Interstate 94 on Saturday, July 9, 2016, in St. Paul, Minn., in response to protesters who blocked the highway. The protesters were rallying in response to the death of Philando Castile, who was shot and killed by a suburban St. Paul police officer on July 6. (AP Photo/Joe Danborn)
A protester watches as police in riot gear clear the street of protesters in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Members of the New Black Panther Party face police in riot gear in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters as police attempt to clear the protesters from the street in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
A protester yells at police in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters after police arrived in riot gear to clear protesters from the street in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. Several protesters were arrested. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Police arrest a protester in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters after police attempted to clear protesters from the street in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. Several protesters were arrested. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
A protester yells at police in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters after police arrived in riot gear to clear protesters from the street in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. Several protesters were arrested. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Members of the New Black Panther Party march in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters in support of justice for Alton Sterling, who was killed by police, in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Protesters are allowed to cross back over the street after police cleared the roadway in front of the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday, July 9, 2016. Several protesters were arrested. (AP Photo/Max Becherer)
Protestors shout slogans during a protest in Times Square in support of the Black lives matter movement in New York on July 09, 2016. The gunman behind a sniper-style attack in Dallas was an Army veteran and loner driven to exact revenge on white officers after the recent deaths of two black men at the hands of police, authorities have said. Micah Johnson, 25, had no criminal history, Dallas police said in a statement. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Police officers stand guard during a protest in Times Square in support of the Black lives matter movement in New York on July 09, 2016. The gunman behind a sniper-style attack in Dallas was an Army veteran and loner driven to exact revenge on white officers after the recent deaths of two black men at the hands of police, authorities have said. Micah Johnson, 25, had no criminal history, Dallas police said in a statement. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Police officers stand guard during a protest in Times Square in support of the Black lives matter movement in New York on July 09, 2016. The gunman behind a sniper-style attack in Dallas was an Army veteran and loner driven to exact revenge on white officers after the recent deaths of two black men at the hands of police, authorities have said. Micah Johnson, 25, had no criminal history, Dallas police said in a statement. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
People shout slogans during a protest in support of the Black lives matter movement in New York on July 09, 2016. The gunman behind a sniper-style attack in Dallas was an Army veteran and loner driven to exact revenge on white officers after the recent deaths of two black men at the hands of police, authorities have said. Micah Johnson, 25, had no criminal history, Dallas police said in a statement. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A protestor shouts slogans during a protest in support of the Black lives matter movement in New York on July 09, 2016. The gunman behind a sniper-style attack in Dallas was an Army veteran and loner driven to exact revenge on white officers after the recent deaths of two black men at the hands of police, authorities have said. Micah Johnson, 25, had no criminal history, Dallas police said in a statement. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
People gather in Union Square during a protest in support of the Black lives matter movement in New York on July 09, 2016. The gunman behind a sniper-style attack in Dallas was an Army veteran and loner driven to exact revenge on white officers after the recent deaths of two black men at the hands of police, authorities have said. Micah Johnson, 25, had no criminal history, Dallas police said in a statement. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
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North Carolina's law now treats all video — those captured through body devices, dashboards and other public surveillance methods — as the same. Previously, the law made only body camera footage a part of an officer's personnel record, which was nearly impossible for the public to access through a request via the Freedom of Information Act. With these new reforms, all police-related videos will be more difficult to access.

WRAL-TV further explains the new law:

Viewing a police video will be restricted to only those members of the public who are captured in the video, and then only with the police chief's or sheriff's agreement. The citizen and his or her attorney or other representative could view it but could not copy or photograph it. The law enforcement agency and the local district attorney would also have access to the video.

A state judge can allow other parties to view the video, as long as the footage is not considered highly personal or does not present a risk to public safety, the new law states. With body cameras being used as a tool to inspire trust between police and citizens. American Civil Liberties Union has called BS on the governor's claims that the bill does not hurt transparency and accountability for law enforcement agencies.

"People who are filmed by police body cameras should not have to spend time and money to go to court in order to see that footage," Susanna Birdsong, policy counsel for the ACLU of North Carolina, said in a statement released Monday. "These barriers are significant and we expect them to drastically reduce any potential this technology had to make law enforcement more accountable to community members."

The existence of police-captured video has been a sticking point in a number of police shooting cases in the last several years. In Minnesota, local Black Lives Matter activists sought police-captured video that they believed shows Jamar Clark was handcuffed and posed no threat to the officers who shot him last November. State and federal prosecutors have declined to prosecute the officers.

Police in Chicago withheld video of the officer-involved shooting death of Laquan McDonald for more than a year, while officers claimed the black teenager charged them with a knife in October 2014. More than a year later, a judge ordered the release of video, which showed McDonald was walking away from police when an officer fired 16 shots at him, prompting local authorities to charge the officer who opened fire.

After signing the legislation, McCrory struck a tone of hopefulness over the nationwide reactions to Castile and Sterling's deaths: "Sadly, our country and state have been through these types of situations before. We've learned from them, we've recovered from them and we've united after them."

Read more:
Diamond Reynolds' Facebook Video Shows Police Shooting of Philando Castile in Minnesota
Video Captures Moment Baton Rouge Police Shot Alton Sterling on the Ground
If We Want to Throw Body Cameras on Every Police Officer, We're Going to Need Better Laws
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