This Microsoft employee just got caught writing the most cringeworthy email of all time

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Eyeing employee emails

The millennial generation seems to change what they find appealing, interesting and relevant minute by minute.

Whether it's the latest Internet phenomenon, meme or slang term, the only way to win over the heart of a millennial is to understand their language (without it feeling forced, of course).

SEE ALSO: 5 things you should never communicate through email

One employer at Microsoft, however, took this idea and ran with it just a little too far.

According to a tweet from Patrick Burtchaell (whose profile states that he's a design student at Loyola University New Orleans), his roommate (who he left unidentified) received this email from a recruiter through the Microsoft University program:

Where do we begin with all of the cringeworthy keywords and forced phrases here?

The opener, "HEY BAE INTERN <3" ("BAE" being used as a term of endearment, standing for "Before Anyone Else") crosses so many lines from the get-go, completely coming off as a come-on.

The first paragraph explains that the recruiter and her team will be making an arduous journey from Seattle to San Francisco to (as the next paragraph explains) throw a party in Microsoft's San Francisco area.

Anyone else think this was a big missed opportunity on the writer's behalf to change "bay area interns" to "bae area interns"? Just a thought.

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The end of the second paragraph is painfully awkward to get through, especially between "hella noms" (translation: there will be food) and "lots of dranks" (another translation: there will be beverages).

And in case you had any doubt, there will be beer pong. Interns everywhere, rejoice!

But what would a powerful opening greeting be if not paired with an equally horrifying closer?

The writer signs off with (in all caps, naturally) "HELL YES TO GETTING LIT ON A MONDAY NIGHT."

Probably not the smartest move to openly advertise getting your interns intoxicated on a work night.

In response, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register:

"The email was poorly worded and not in keeping with our values as a company. We are looking into how this occurred and will take appropriate steps to address it."

"Poorly worded" might be the understatement of the century but the statement does in fact confirm that it was not a desperate attempt on Microsoft's behalf to connect with millennials and the company's 2016 summer interns.

Here's to hoping that Microsoft can appease the damage and send out their next round of emails that are equally as "lit".

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