What you need to know about Mary Fallin, Donald Trump's potential running mate

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List of potential Trump VP picks narrows

With Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa out of the running, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin is likely the last woman standing on Donald Trump's vice presidential shortlist.

Equipped with more than a quarter-century of experience in elected office, Fallin, 61, has served as the Sooner State's governor since 2011. Endorsing Trump after he clinched the Republican presidential nomination in May, Fallin made no secret of her interest in the No. 2 job, saying she'd be "happy to take that call."

Here's a closer look at the prospective veep.

RELATED: Marry Fallin throughout her career

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Potential Trump VP pick Mary Fallin over the years
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Potential Trump VP pick Mary Fallin over the years
Oklahoma Republican Governor Mary Fallin makes remarks before the opening of the National Governors Association Winter Meeting in Washington, in this February 22, 2014 file photo. REUTERS/Mike Theiler/Files
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 21, 2015. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin addresses the crowd during the 20th Remembrance Ceremony, the anniversary ceremony for victims of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, at the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum in Oklahoma City April 19, 2015. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin speaks to reporters after a National Governors Association event hosted by U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington February 24, 2014. Standing next to Fallin are Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal (L) and Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley (R). REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Governors Mary Fallin (L) (R-OK) and Bobby Jindal (R-LA) listen as Governor Dannel Malloy (R) (D-CT) speaks to reporters after a National Governors Association event hosted by U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington February 24, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Republican Governor Mary Fallin of Oklahoma (R) chats with Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper during a "Growth and Jobs in America" discussion at the National Governors Association Winter Meeting in Washington, February 23, 2014. The governors will be meeting with administration officials, members of Congress and business leaders as they discuss the nation's economy, education issues, environmental concerns and health and human services. REUTERS/Mike Theiler (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (R-OK) (L) toast after their remarks at the 2014 Governors' Dinner in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, February 23, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
(L-R) Governor Bobby Jindal (R-LA), Governor Mary Fallin (R-OK), Governor John Kasich (R-OH) and Governor Rick Snyder (R-MI) answer questions during a media briefing at the 2013 Republican Governors Association conference in Scottsdale, Arizona November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Samantha Sais (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Members of the Executive Committee of the National Governors Association speak to reporters after meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington January 14, 2014. From left, they are: Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton, Arkansas Governor Mike Beebe, Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, Utah Governor Gary Herbert and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Governor Mary Fallin (R-OK) listens to a question from Morning Joe host Joe Scarborough during the plenary session entitled "State of play - The Key to GOP Messaging in 2014" at the 2013 Republican Governors Association conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Samantha Sais (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (R) holds her hands up next to her husband Wade Christensen at the First Baptist Church of Moore memorial service held for the community following the large tornado in Moore, Oklahoma May 26, 2013. REUTERS/Sue Ogrocki/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT RELIGION POLITICS)
Governor Mary Fallin (R-OK) listens to responses during the plenary session entitled "State of play - The Key to GOP Messaging in 2014" at the 2013 Republican Governors Association conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, November 20, 2013. REUTERS/Samantha Sais (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin holds a sign she found at Plaza Towers elementary school while speaking at the First Baptist Church of Moore community memorial service following the large tornado in Moore, Oklahoma May 26, 2013. REUTERS/Sue Ogrocki/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER POLITICS ENVIRONMENT RELIGION)
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (C) speaks during a press conference with city officials in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013. The tornado, with winds that may have topped 200 miles (322 km) per hour, killed at least 24 people and injured hundreds more, with many of the casualties children from two schools that were destroyed. REUTERS/Gene Blevins (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
National Governors Association (NGA) Executive Committee Vice Chair and Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (C) and Chairman and Delaware Governor Jack Markell (L) walk out after meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, December 4, 2012. With a few weeks remaining before the onset of "fiscal cliff," a bipartisan delegation of governors will meet Obama and congressional leaders on Tuesday in search of some answers about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgets, which rely heavily on federal aid. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
National Governors Association (NGA) Executive Committee Vice Chair and Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (C) speaks to the media after meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, December 4, 2012. With a few weeks remaining before the onset of "fiscal cliff," a bipartisan delegation of governors will meet Obama and congressional leaders on Tuesday in search of some answers about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgets, which rely heavily on federal aid. From L-R are: Utah Governor Gary Herbert, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton, Fallin, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, and Chairman Delaware Governor Jack Markell. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin speaks at the First Baptist Church of Moore community memorial service following the large tornado in Moore, Oklahoma May 26, 2013. REUTERS/Sue Ogrocki/Pool (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER POLITICS ENVIRONMENT RELIGION)
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (L) stands next to Mayor Hank Cross as they look at the damage caused by Tuesday's tornado which hit the town of Chickasha, Oklahoma May 25, 2011. The death toll from a monster tornado that savaged Joplin, Missouri, rose to 125 on Wednesday as tornadoes overnight in nearby states caused at least 13 more deaths. Eight died in Oklahoma, while Arkansas officials confirmed three deaths, and two deaths were confirmed in Kansas from a line of several tornadoes that roared across the Midwest overnight. REUTERS/Bill Waugh (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin looks at the damage at a trailer park, in ruins after Tuesday's tornado which hit the town of Chickasha, Oklahoma May 25, 2011. The death toll from a monster tornado that savaged Joplin, Missouri, rose to 125 on Wednesday as tornadoes overnight in nearby states caused at least 13 more deaths. Eight died in Oklahoma, while Arkansas officials confirmed three deaths, and two deaths were confirmed in Kansas from a line of several tornadoes that roared across the Midwest overnight. REUTERS/Bill Waugh (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
Oklahoma Governor-elect Mary Fallin (L) walks with House Speaker-designate John Boehner (R-OH) after a meeting with Republican governors-elect in the Capitol in Washington December 1, 2010. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
Oklahoma Governor Brad Henry (R) speaks as Lt. Governor Mary Fallin (C) and Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett watch at a news conference in front of a burnt home in Oklahoma City January 2, 2006. Wildfires fueled by wind and dry climate moved into Oklahoma City Sunday forcing the evacuation of residents. MANDATORY CREDIT REUTERS/Oklahoman/Matt Strasen
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Who is Mary Fallin?

A graduate of Oklahoma State University, Fallin made her first foray into electoral politics in 1990, winning election to the state legislature. Four years later, Fallin was elected to her first of three terms as lieutenant governor of Oklahoma.

In 2006, voters in the state's fifth congressional district sent Fallin to Washington, D.C., where she served two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives prior to her election to the governorship.

What You Need to Know About Mary Fallin, Donald Trump's Potential Running Mate
Fallin celebrates her re-election to Congress in 2008.
Source: Sue Ogrocki/AP

Fallin's first marriage, to dentist Joseph Fallin, ended in divorce. Since 2009, Fallin has been married to attorney Wade Christensen; according to her official state biography, the pair have six children between them.

Last year, Fallin attracted national attention when her then-28-year-old daughter, Christina, was forced to move her trailer off the governor's mansion grounds. Fallin explained that she allowed the arrangement — a violation of zoning regulations — because her daughter was "in-between living arrangements" at the time.

Why would Trump pick her?

For a candidate viewed unfavorably by a staggering seven in 10 women, selecting a female running mate may help alleviate some of Trump's gender woes, and would also bring history-making appeal to the GOP ticket as it faces off against presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, who would be the first woman president.

Moreover, Fallin's combination of experience as a state executive and member of Congress could prove attractive for Trump, a political neophyte who has struggled to consolidate establishment GOP support.

Crucially, Fallin is aligned with Trump on immigration, one of his signature issues. As governor, she has crusaded against the Obama administration's immigration policies, arguing that undocumented immigrants have strained her state's resources.

What You Need to Know About Mary Fallin, Donald Trump's Potential Running Mate
Mary Fallin greets Trump after a February rally in Oklahoma City.
Source: Sue Ogrocki/AP

What are Fallin's downsides?

Presiding over Oklahoma's energy-intensive economy at a time of declines in oil and gas prices, Fallin signed a state budget last month that would likely provide substantial fodder for Democratic opposition researchers.

Forced to close a $1.3 billion shortfall, Fallin slashed spending on higher education, health care and corrections, while eliminating some tax credits. The contentious state budget fight appears to have damaged Fallin's popularity in Oklahoma: A Morning Consult poll in May found that only 42% of Sooners approved of her job performance, while 47% disapproved.

Fallin may also generate controversy among social conservatives, a crucial GOP constituency that's already skeptical of the brash billionaire atop the ticket. Though Fallin opposes abortion rights, she drew the ire of many anti-abortion activists in May, when she vetoed a bill that would have jailed abortion providers, calling the measure "so ambiguous and so vague" and arguing that it was unlikely to survive a court challenge.

How likely is Trump to pick her?

A Trump-Fallin ticket appears considerably less likely than, say, a Trump-Gingrich or a Trump-Christie one.

Largely unknown outside her home state, Fallin is untested in the national spotlight, and her middling poll numbers in deep-red Oklahoma may give the Trump campaign pause about offering her a promotion.

What's more, campaign chairman Paul Manafort has indicated that the Trump camp is wary of putting a woman on the ticket, asserting that such a move would be seen as naked "pandering."

RELATED: Trumps possible VP picks

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