3 weird things you can ignore when home shopping

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In 15 years of real estate, I can honestly say that I've seen it all. Toilet seats up in listing photos, shag carpet covered with dog hair, bedrooms doubling as marijuana growing centers, and avocado green appliances from the '70s.

Sellers aren't required to get their homes in their best condition before showing them — let alone cleaning their home before listing. But one seller's laziness can spell a giant upside for the right buyer.

Here are three sights that may be off-putting when you're shopping for a home, but shouldn't stop you from considering making an offer — particularly if you love the home, layout or location.

Odd wallpaper and dirty carpet

Today's buyers generally prefer a home that's turn-key or move-in ready. They're too busy with their day-to-day lives to take on a renovation — and this is especially true for the continuously connected, mobile-ready millennial home buyer.

But painting walls and replacing carpets isn't always time-consuming or expensive, and you can do these projects before moving in.

If a seller won't replace their shag carpet or paint the interior a neutral color, they're shooting themselves in the foot.

A fresh coat of paint and finished floors or new carpet won't break the bank or take more than a week, and the end product will be a like-new home for you to move into.

RELATED: Here's the salary needed to buy a home in 19 major U.S. cities

19 PHOTOS
Salary to buy a home in 19 major US cities
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Salary to buy a home in 19 major US cities

19. San Antonio

Population: 1,409,000

Median Home Price: $192,100

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,096

Salary Needed to Buy: $46,000

Photo via Getty

18. Orlando

Population: 255,483

Median Home Price: $205,000

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,115

Salary Needed to Buy: $48,000

Photo via AOL

17. Minneapolis

Population: 407,207

Median Home Price: $223,700

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,172

Salary Needed to Buy: $50,500

Photo via AOL

16. Philadelphia

Population: 1,517,628

Median Home Price: $213,700

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,204

Salary Needed to Buy: $51,500

Photo via Getty

15. Dallas

Population: 2,518,638

Median Home Price: $206,200

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,208

Salary Needed to Buy: $52,000

Photo via Getty

14. Houston

Population: 2,076,189

Median Home Price: $209,200

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,217

Salary Needed to Buy: $52,000

Photo via Getty

13. Baltimore

Population: 640,064

Median Home Price: $233,500

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,233

Salary Needed to Buy: $53,000

Photo via Getty

12. Chicago

Population: 2,824,584

Median Home Price: $209,800

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,352

Salary Needed to Buy: $58,000

Photo via Getty

11. Sacramento

Population: 479,686

Median Home Price: $294,100

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,450

Salary Needed to Buy: $62,000

Photo via Getty

10. Miami

Population: 417,650

Median Home Price: $286,000

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,471

Salary Needed to Buy: $63,000

Photo via AOL

9. Portland

Population: 609,456

Median Home Price: $318,300

Monthly Mortgage Payment $1,538

Salary Needed to Buy: $66,000

Photo via AOL

8. Denver

Population: 649,495

Median Home Price: $353,500

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,596

Salary Needed to Buy: $68,500

Photo via AOL

7. Seattle

Population: 652,405

Median Home Price: $385,300

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,829

Salary Needed to Buy: $78,500

Photo via Getty

6. Washington, DC

Population: 582,049

Median Home Price: $371,600

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,834

Salary Needed to Buy: $78,500

Photo via Getty

5. Boston

Population: 645,966

Median Home Price: $393,600

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $1,940

Salary Needed to Buy: $83,000

Photo via Getty

4. New York City

Population: 8,213,839

Median Home Price: $384,600

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $2,024

Salary Needed to Buy: $87,000

Photo via Getty

3. Los Angeles

Population: 3,794,640

Median Home Price: $481,900

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $2,217

Salary Needed to Buy: $95,000

Photo via Getty

2. San Diego

Population: 1,284,347

Median Home Price: $546,800

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $2,407

Salary Needed to Buy: $103,000

Photo via Getty

1. San Francisco

Population: 777,660

Median Home Price: $781,600

Monthly Mortgage Payment: $3,453

Salary Needed to Buy: $148,000

Photo via Getty

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Rooms being strangely used

It's not uncommon to see a home's dining room transformed into a full-fledged office. Some homeowners even have a bedroom doubling as a walk-in closet. I once saw a first-floor bedroom turned into a wine-tasting room.

Just because the homeowner uses these spaces in a way that suits them, doesn't mean you have to. These rooms might stand out as odd to you, but try to forget that the seller lives there.

Once they've moved out, the dining room will be a space that just needs a great light fixture and table. The walk-in closet can be turned back into a bedroom in less than a day.

A too-strong seller presence

It's difficult for a buyer to imagine themselves in a home if it's full of the seller's photos, diplomas and other personal belongings. The best homes for buyers are those that are neutral and lacking any items specific to the owner.

What's worse is when the seller is present at a showing. It makes everyone uncomfortable. The buyers feel like they need to be on their best behavior and can't explore the house, dig deep into closets or cabinets, or feel free to talk out loud about what they see.

A home that is too personalized or where the seller is always present can sit on the market and get a bad reputation over time. A smart buyer will use that to their advantage and snag it below the asking price.

Sellers who sabotage their home sale — whether intentionally or not — leave money on the table for the buyer. But typical consumers today have a hard time seeing through a seller's mess, personalized design style or custom changes.

If you see a home online that's in a great location with a floor plan that's ideal, go see it. Ignore the things you can change, and think about whether you can make the home your own.

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