You can now apply to be a hedgehog officer

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You Can Apply to Be a Hedgehog Officer

You can now apply for one of the best jobs ever, hedgehog officer!

That's right, you can get paid to hang out with tons of adorable hedgehogs.

SEE ALSO: Rescued pink hedgehog bonds with dog siblings

The Suffolk Wildlife Trust is looking to hire someone to be the face of hedgehog conservation in Ipswich, England.

Ipswich is known as a hedgehog hotspot, but he population has decreased 30% in 10 years.

The job pays $31,800 a year for a minimum of two years and includes a wide array of important duties.

The hedgehog officer will be in charge of the creation of "hedgehog streets" that the animals will be able to use to easily and efficiently travel from garden to garden in order to establish a network of feeding, nesting, and hibernating across the town.

The hedgehog officer will also need to lead events and campaigns to help raise awareness about hedgehog population protection.

But don't update your resume just yet. Thinking hedgehogs are super cute won't be enough to land you the job.

You'll need to be extensively experienced in ecological surveying and conservation activities.

For everyone else, you can still help out the hedgehogs by donating to Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

Related: Peek inside Tokyo's hedgehog cafe:

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Tokyo hedgehog cafe
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Tokyo hedgehog cafe
Hedgehogs sit in a glass enclosure at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A staff member (L) takes a hedgehog from a glass enclosure at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A board shows a selection of hedgehogs for sale at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. Prices are shown in yen. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A hedgehog walks next to a mobile phone with a hedgehog cover at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A woman holds a hedgehog at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Hedgehogs sit in a glass enclosure at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A hedgehog stands up in a glass enclosure at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A woman holds a hedgehog at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A woman holds a hedgehog at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
A hedgehog sits in a glass enclosure at the Harry hedgehog cafe in Tokyo, Japan, April 5, 2016. In a new animal-themed cafe, 20 to 30 hedgehogs of different breeds scrabble and snooze in glass tanks in Tokyo's Roppongi entertainment district. Customers have been queuing to play with the prickly mammals, which have long been sold in Japan as pets. The cafe's name Harry alludes to the Japanese word for hedgehog, harinezumi. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
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