Twitter keeps the last Blockbuster alive

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Twitter Keeps The Last Blockbuster Alive

Remember Blockbuster, the amazing store with every movie you could ever want to see right at your fingertips?

It was glorious, and then streaming came along and ruined everything.

While most Blockbusters around the world are now out of business, one or two remain as lone holdouts, even without their now defunct corporate bosses, and they are reminding us of their existence via Twitter.

SEE ALSO: Yes, you can still visit Blockbuster stores today

Lone Blockbuster is open and they are urging you to quit Netflix and chill.

There's also the Last Blockbuster, keeping their existence alive on Twitter as well:

#BestPartOfThe90sWas that people came into my store constantly so I didn't feel the pressure I do today to nail a casual social interaction.

This might not really be the end of Blockbuster. After all, if they can bring back Crystal Pepsi, anything is possible.

RELATED: A look back at Blockbuster:

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A look back at Blockbuster
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A look back at Blockbuster
Jamie Flores, second right, manager of a Blockbuster store in New York, prepares a sale on Friday, Dec. 24, 1999. Best-known for its video rentals, Blockbuster also sells videos and DVDs, as well as CDs, books and toys. Blockbuster will be open on Christmas Day to facilitate last-minute shopping by customers. (AP Photo/Ed Bailey)
Aneta Kucharska, left, and Spence Bromberg look over the movies for sale at a Dallas Blockbuster store Thursday, Oct. 31, 2002. Blockbuster has become synomous with movie rentals, but most customers go elsewhere to buy videos and DVDs. The chain is responding by remodeling more than 4000 stores to put sales racks front and center. (AP Photo/Ron Heflin)
A Blockbuster video rental store is shown in Dallas, Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2004. Viacom Inc. announced that it plans to shed its controlling stake in Blockbuster, and take a $1.3 billion charge to write down the value of the business. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Chelsea Burns returns a video to a Dallas Blockbuster outlet before noon on Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2004 to avoid late fees. After Jan. 1, 2005, Blockbuste Inc. plans to eliminate late fees on games and movies. (AP Photo/Ron Heflin)
A customer enters a Blockbuster video store in Newark, N.J., Friday, Feb. 18, 2005. The state of New Jersey filed a consumer-protection lawsuit Friday charging that Blockbuster Inc. failed to disclose key terms in it's advertised end of late fees policy, including that overdue rentals are automatically converted to a sale on the eighth day after the due date. (AP Photo/Mike Derer)
A customer looking at rental videos is seen through the window of a Blockbuster video store in Newark, N.J., Friday, Feb. 18, 2005. The state of New Jersey filed a consumer-protection lawsuit Friday charging that Blockbuster Inc. failed to disclose key terms in it's advertised end of late fees policy, including that overdue rentals are automatically converted to a sale on the eighth day after the due date. (AP Photo/Mike Derer)
Customers enter a Blockbuster video outlet in Dallas, Sunday evening, Aug. 7, 2005. On Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2005 the video rental company said it fell to a loss in the second quarter after eliminating late fees cut into its overall revenue. In the latest three-month period, Blockbuster's loss was $57.2 million, or 31 cents per share, compared with income of $48.6 million, or 27 cents, the year before. (AP Photo/Ron Heflin)
A marquee announcing new releases, including Dimension Films' "Sin City," just 4 1/2 months from the end of its initial theatrical run, is seen at a Blockbuster Video store in Los Angeles Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2005. A lackluster summer box office and slowing demand for DVDs have reignited a long-simmering disagreement between Hollywood studios and theater owners over how fast films go from the megaplex to Wal-Mart. Studios increasingly dependent on lucrative home video revenue are releasing movies on DVD faster than ever. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
A customer looks at a selection of films for at the Blockbuster Video store in Los Angeles Thursday, March 9, 2006. Blockbuster Inc. said Thursday that its fourth-quarter profit increased significantly as the video rental company cut costs, offsetting a revenue decline amid a drop-off in rentals and elimination of late fees. (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)
A customer walks through a Blockbuster store in Trooper, Pa., on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007. Movie rental company Blockbuster Inc. said Tuesday its fourth-quarter earnings declined 28 percent on increased operating costs. (AP Photo/George Widman)
People walk into a Blockbuster video rental store in Dallas, Tuesday evening, July 24, 2007. Blockbuster Inc. said Thursday, July 26, 2007 it swung to a second-quarter loss as the video rental company spent heavily on its online business to compete with rival Netflix Inc. Its shares fell more than 3 percent. (AP Photo/Ron Heflin)
A customer holds her membership card outside the Blockbuster video store in Woodmere, Ohio, on Friday, May 9, 2008. Consumer electronics retailer Circuit City Stores said Friday that it will allow Blockbuster to review its books in connection with the video-rental chain's bid to buy the company. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
A Blockbuster store is seen in Barre, Vt., Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2010. Troubled video-rental chain Blockbuster Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, and said Thusrday, Sept. 23, it plans to keep stores and kiosks open as it reorganizes. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
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