Jupiter mission added to list of NASA's July 4th missions

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Jupiter mission added to list of NASA's July 4th missions

NASA's Juno spacecraft will begin orbiting Jupiter this July 4th, after traveling 5 years in space.

This is not the first time NASA has made history on the Fourth of July. Here's a few times we celebrated Independence Day in space, without Will Smith...

1982: President Reagan welcomes astronauts returning from a space shuttle test flight, declaring the Columbia space mission a go!

1997: The very first Mars Rover touches down on the red planet, a milestone in Mars exploration.

2005: The first man-made object is landed on a comet. NASA smashes a space probe into Comet Tempel 1 at 23,000 mph.

2006: The space shuttle Discovery launches as astronauts deliver supplies to the International Space Station. They spend July 4 and the next two weeks orbiting Earth.

Click through the gallery Scott Kelly playing water ping pong in space...

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Scott Kelly plays water ping pong in space
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Scott Kelly plays water ping pong in space
Courtesy: YouTube
Courtesy: YouTube
Courtesy: YouTube
Courtesy: YouTube
Courtesy: YouTube
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, who marked day 300 of a historic year in space on Jan. 21, 2016, shows off another fascinating feature of life in microgravity. Kelly used two paddles with hydrophobic, or water repellant, features to pass a sphere of water back and forth. Scientists use the microgravity environment of the space station to advance scientific knowledge in Earth, space, physical, and biological sciences that otherwise wouldn't be possible down here on the planet. The paddles are polycarbonate laser etched so that the surfaces are actually arrays of 300 micrometer posts (0.3mm). The surfaces were then spray coated with a Teflon coat. The combined effects of surface roughness and non-wettability produce a super-hydrophobic surface capable of preventing water adhesion in dynamic processes. The larger the drop, the less force it takes to break it up. The smaller the drop, the harder you can hit it. Scott is demonstrating about a 4 mL drop (over 100 times larger than a rain drop). Learn more and follow along with the one-year mission online or using #YearInSpace http://www.nasa.gov/oneyear Read more on 4K in space: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/red_epic_dragon_camera/ *To view in 4k, be sure to change resolution under "Settings" menu in YouTube viewer to "2160p 4k". (Video: NASA) HD download link: https://archive.org/details/NASA-Ultra-High-Definition ________________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/
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