Hubble telescope captures stunning auroras on Jupiter

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Hubble Telescope Captures Stunning Auroras On Jupiter

Jupiter is well known for its immense size and intense storms, but the planet also hosts some pretty impressive light shows.

Astronomers taking advantage of the Hubble Space Telescope's ultraviolet capabilities recently released a stunning image of auroras swirling over the gas giant.

The bright and lively features appear near the poles when highly energized matter comes into contact with gas atoms.

Researchers are currently studying how auroras are affected by solar wind, which is packed with charged particles.

In addition to gathering information via the Hubble, they are examining data collected by NASA's Juno spacecraft, which is scheduled to enter the planet's orbit on July 4.

Jonathan Nichols, the lead researcher, said, "It almost seems as if Jupiter is throwing a firework party for the imminent arrival of Juno."

Learn more about Jupiter's red spot:

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Jupiter Red Spot
This undated composite handout image provided by NASA, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows the planet Jupiter and the The Great Red Spot in 2014, left; in 1995, top right; 2009, center right; and 2014, bottom right. Jupiter’s signature Great Red Spot is on a cosmic diet, shrinking rapidly before our eyes. Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope calculate that the spot, a giant long-lasting storm, is narrowing by about 580 miles a year, much faster than before. In the late 1800s the red spot was an elongated oval 25,500 miles wide. Now it’s a svelte circle that’s 10,250 miles across. (AP Photo/NASA)
This image provided by NASA shows the Great Red Spot and Red Spot Jr. — in the turbulent Jovian atmosphere. This third red spot, which is a fraction of the size of the two other features, lies to the west of the Great Red Spot in the same latitude band of clouds. The visible-light images were taken on May 9 and 10 with Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The new red spot was previously a white oval-shaped storm. The change to a red color indicates its swirling storm clouds are rising to heights like the clouds of the Great Red Spot. One possible explanation is that the red storm is so powerful it dredges material from deep beneath Jupiter's cloud tops and lifts it to higher altitudes where solar ultraviolet radiation — via some unknown chemical reaction — produces the familiar brick color. (AP Photo/NASA)
This image provided by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope Thursday May 4, 2006 shows a second red spot, lower left, emerging on Jupiter. For the first time in history, astronomers have witnessed the birth of a new red spot on the giant planet, which is located half a billion miles away. The storm is roughly one-half the diameter of its bigger and legendary cousin, the Great Red Spot. Researchers suggest that the new spot may be related to a possible major climate change in Jupiter's atmosphere. This image was taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys on April 25, 2006.
This dramatic view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and its surroundings was obtained by Voyager 1 on Feb. 25, 1979. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Jupiter's trademark Great Red Spot — a swirling storm feature larger than Earth — is shrinking. This downsizing, which is changing the shape of the spot from an oval into a circle, has been known about since the 1930s, but now these striking new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images capture the spot at a smaller size than ever before.
This dramatic view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and its surroundings was obtained by Voyager 1 on Feb. 25, 1979. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 13: This photograph taken by Voyager 1 shows a close up of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, a storm that has been raging in the gas giant�s atmosphere for at least three hundred years. The white spot shows another cloud system that is believed to have formed around 1940. Jupiter�s atmosphere is made up of 90 % hydrogen and almost 10 % helium, together with traces of other gases, including methane and ammonia. Immensely strong winds occur, and the storm clouds exhibit colours which are thought to be due to chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The two Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977 to explore the planets in the outer solar system. Voyager 1 flew past Jupiter at a distance of 278,000 kilometres in March 1979 before flying on to Saturn. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Jupiter fr. equator to southern polar latitudes close to Great Red Spot, as depicted by Voyager spacecraft. (Photo by Time Life Pictures/NASA/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)
circa 1973: An artist's impression of a Pioneer probe passing the Great Red Spot on Jupiter during its mission to photograph the planet's surface and send back data. (Photo by NASA/Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
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