Capybara spent a month on the lam after escape from Toronto Zoo

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Two Capybara Are On The Lam From Toronto Zoo

After more than a month as a free rodent, the escaped Toronto Zoo capybara is back behind bars.

Toronto officials nailed the 6-month-old guy (or girl, as it's very difficult to tell the sex of capybaras in their first year), who had been out of his enclosure since May 24, in a nearby park. His partner in crime had been previously captured.

Capybaras, which are active during the daytime, proved elusive and difficult to trap for zoo officials, who couldn't leave traps out overnight for fear of capturing raccoons or cats.

[H/T Globe and Mail]

More adorable photos of capybaras:

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Capybaras
A capybara mother and her young walk investigate each other in their enclosure at the zoo in the northern German city of Hanover on May 14, 2008. The capybara is the largest living rodent in the world and is mainly found in South America. AFP PHOTO DDP/ NIGEL TREBLIN GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read NIGEL TREBLIN/AFP/Getty Images)
A Capybara (Hydrochaeris) sleeps inside its cage at the Emperor Valley Zoo and Botanical Garden of Port of Spain in Trinidad and Tobago on March 19, 2008. Capybaras are the largest living rodents. AFP PHOTO/Yuri CORTEZ (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Two baby capybaras explore their enclosure on November 3, 2011 at the zoo in Schwerin, northeastern Germany. The animals were born at the zoo on November 1, 2011. Capybaras, relative to guinea pigs, are the largest living rodents in the world and are native to South America. AFP PHOTO JENS BUETTNER GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read JENS BUTTNER/AFP/Getty Images)
Three baby capybaras are accompanied by their mother as they explore their enclosure on November 3, 2011 at the zoo in Schwerin, northeastern Germany. The animals were born at the zoo on November 1, 2011. Capybaras, relative to guinea pigs, are the largest living rodents in the world and are native to South America. AFP PHOTO JENS BUETTNER GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read JENS BUTTNER/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Hector Velasco A capybara rests on one of the banks of the Paraguay river, in Corumba, a municipality in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul gateway to the Pantanal, on April 4, 2013. Often referred to as the worldâs largest freshwater wetland system, the Pantanal, is a stunning biodiversity sanctuary which extends through millions of hectares in central-western Brazil, eastern Bolivia and eastern Paraguay. It includes sanctuaries for migratory birds, nursery grounds for aquatic life, and refuges for such creatures as the yacare caiman, deer, and jaguar. Some 4,500 different species live in the Pantanal. AFP PHOTO/Yasuyoshi CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
A family of capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) rests on one of the banks of the Paraguay river, in Caceres, Brazil, the gateway to the Pantanal, on August 25, 2014. Often referred to as the worlds largest freshwater wetland system, the Pantanal, is a stunning biodiversity sanctuary which extends through millions of hectares in central-western Brazil, eastern Bolivia and eastern Paraguay. It includes sanctuaries for migratory birds, nursery grounds for aquatic life, and refuges for such creatures as the yacare caiman, deer, and jaguar. Some 4,500 different species live in the Pantanal. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Capybara bathes in the hot spring water at the Saitama Children's zoo in Higashi Matsuyama city, Saitama prefecture on December 21, 2014. Seven capybaras in the zoo, originally from South America, enjoyed the hot spring water on the chilly winter day in Japan. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Capybara rests inside its enclosure at the San Diego Zoo, California on January 13, 2015. Capybara's are native to South America are excellent swimmers and also the worlds largest rodent. AFP PHOTO/MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Three baby capybaras explore their enclosure on November 3, 2011 at the zoo in Schwerin, northeastern Germany. The animals were born at the zoo on November 1, 2011. Capybaras, relative to guinea pigs, are the largest living rodents in the world and are native to South America. AFP PHOTO JENS BUETTNER GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read JENS BUETTNER/AFP/Getty Images)
A family of capybara, the world's largest rodent sit in a hot bath at the Saitama Children's Zoo in Higashimatsuyama city in Saitama prefecture, suburban Tokyo on December 27, 2009. The zoo provided the bath for the capybaras on a cold winter day. AFP PHOTO / YOSHIKAZU TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
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