Arctic wolf pups to become wildlife center 'wolf ambassadors'

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Adorable Pups Arrive At Sanctuary To Begin 'Wolf Ambassador' Training

DIVIDE, Colo. -- As a little girl, when Casey Hampf heard the story of the three little pigs and the big bad wolf, she was pulling for the wolf, "I absolutely do love wolves. You get to know them and they're all so completely different."

Now, all grown up, Hampf takes care of wolves, and other predators, at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center in Divide.

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"The mission is to educate the public about what's happening with wolves today. Simple biology, the ecology," she said.

Two coyotes, two red and four swift foxes along with 17 wolves all call the wildlife center home. That includes two 5-week-old Arctic wolf pups, Raksha and Isha.

"These two came from a breeder in Texas who breeds highly socialized wolves," Hampf said.

That's good because Raksha and Isha will have jobs. They'll eventually become ambassador wolves.

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"A wolf ambassador is a very highly socialized wolf who can go off-site and potentially meet school groups and do other big events," Hampf said.

So far, the wolf pups are drawing quite a crowd at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center.

After the photo op by wolf fans from around the country, it was time to do what wolf pups do best: Sleep.

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