A man with a carry and conceal gun stopped a mass shooting at a nightclub

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Mass Shootings in America

Gun control advocates say it's ridiculous to expect that armed patrons to stop mass shootings at nightclubs, as Donald Trump and others have suggested.

I can sympathize with this. It seems impractical in so many respects and the mixture of alcohol and guns on a regular basis could be a real cause for concern.

But I can also sympathize with armed nightclub patrons who actually do stop mass shootings.

South Carolina's WISTV reports:

Deputies with Spartanburg County said a man faces multiple attempted murder charges after opening fire outside a nightclub early Sunday morning...

Deputies said 32-year-old Jody Ray Thompson pulled out a gun after getting into an argument with another man and fired several rounds toward a crowd that had gathered out in front of the club.

"His rounds struck 3 victims, and almost struck a fourth victim, who in self-defense, pulled his own weapon and fired, striking Thompson in the leg," Lt. Kevin Bobo said.

WISTV continued, "Bobo said the man who shot Thompson has a valid concealed weapons permit, cooperated with investigators, and won't be facing any charges."

This happened in my home state of South Carolina where carry conceal is commonplace. A shooter in my hometown of Charleston was stopped the same way late last year. I wrote in October:

When I visit home, in Charleston, South Carolina, I often go to a particular Waffle House to sit, eat and work. A few of the longtime servers there always remember me as the man who brings his computer (Waffle House isn't exactly Starbucks).

Saturday, an armed man attempted to rob that Waffle House. Another armed man, a customer, shot and killed the robber.

Two men. Two guns. One fortunate outcome.

I continued (emphasis added):

Of course there could have been other outcomes. The customer could have mistakenly shot someone innocent. The robber could have fired his weapon, shooting an innocent person, something he might not have done if he wasn't fired upon first.

The employees and customers could have been shot and killed by the robber.

There are so many different things that could have happened. This is exactly what gun control advocates imagine—that the prevalence of firearms in society could lead to our streets and cities becoming the Wild West.

But does anyone, including gun control supporters, wish that armed customer had not been in that Waffle House on Saturday and not done what he did?

Similarly, does anyone–even the most avid gun control advocate–wish the man who fired back at the would-be mass shooter at the South Carolina nightclub Sunday had not done so?

For some valid reasons, many think it's outrageous to expect bar customers to shoot back in a mass shooting incident.

Until they do.

More on gun laws:

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This December 2012 photo released by the Connecticut State Police on Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, shows a scene at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Adam Lanza gunned down 20 first-graders and six educators with a semi-automatic rifle at the school on Dec. 14, 2012, after killing his mother inside their home. Lanza committed suicide with a handgun as police arrived at the school. (AP Photo/Connecticut State Police)
This evidence photo contained in a document titled "Sec 15 - Firearm Survey - Savage," in a report of an investigation released by the Connecticut State Police, Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, shows a weapon. Adam Lanza gunned down 20 first-graders and six educators with a semi-automatic rifle at Sandy Hook Elementary School on Dec. 14, 2012, in Newtown, after killing his mother inside their home. Lanza committed suicide with a handgun as police arrived at the school. (AP Photo/Connecticut State Police)
This image contained in the "Appendix to Report on the Shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School and 36 Yogananda St., Newtown, Connecticut On December 14, 2012" and released Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, by the Danbury, Conn., State’s Attorney shows a weapon found at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Adam Lanza opened fire inside the school killing 20 first-graders and six educators before killing himself as police arrived. (AP Photo/Office of the Connecticut State's Attorney Judicial District of Danbury)
This image contained in the "Appendix to Report on the Shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School and 36 Yogananda St., Newtown, Connecticut On December 14, 2012" and released Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, by the Danbury, Conn., State’s Attorney shows ammunition found at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Adam Lanza opened fire inside the school killing 20 first-graders and six educators before killing himself as police arrived. (AP Photo/Office of the Connecticut State's Attorney Judicial District of Danbury)
Plastic cups sit at memorial Monday, Oct. 27, 2014 at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Wash. The cups cover candles and bear the names of Zoe R. Galasso, right, and Gia Soriano, left, both 14, who were killed when Jaylen R. Fryberg, 15, named on the center candle, opened fire Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, in the school cafeteria before taking his own life. The school will be closed all week. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Part of a sign that reads "Cracked But Not Broken," hangs Monday, Oct. 27, 2014, at a growing memorial on a fence around Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Wash. On Friday, Oct. 24, a student opened fire in the school cafeteria, killing two fellow students before taking his own life. The school will be closed all week. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
MARYSVILLE, WA - OCTOBER 31: A sign is pictured at a memorial at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on October 31, 2014 in Marysville, Washington. The Marysville community continues to recover after last week's school shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School that has left four dead and two hospitalized. (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)
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One Waffle House employee said of the armed customer who stopped the shooting in her restaurant "He saved us, that's what he did."

Still, you won't hear as much about incidents like these two in South Carolina.

Armed citizens made sure of that.

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