State decides to euthanize park geese for them to become meals for food bank

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Which City Plans To Turn Its Goose Problem Into A Food Solution?

100 to 300 geese at two parks in Maryland will soon be euthanized and turned into food to be served at a food banks, according to WTOP.

Authorities have decided to take this measure after non-lethal methods over the years have failed to control the massive population of geese.

"We didn't jump to this method," David Petersen, natural resources specialist for Montgomery Parks, told WTOP. "It's not something we take lightly."

Excessive feces is one of the main problems the parks face with the geese. Their grazing can also be damaging to turf and athletic fields. The protective geese can also be a threat to small children at times.

"For a number of years we've been trying to control the geese and the issues they bring," Petersen said. "We've had everything from mess management to habitat landscape manipulation, some control devices such as sprinklers and bubblers in the ponds at MLK. All these things have been marginally effective."

But the method is being met with controversy. The Humane Society of the United States has expressed concern, preferring the park continue to use non-lethal methods.

"For us it's the first time we've used this method, but it is by no means unprecedented in our area," Petersen explained.

"Throughout the region, this is a control method that's been used for decades," he said. "It's used anywhere from local agencies up to federal agencies, as well as private entities, homeowners associations not only in the region but also in the country, too."

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Mud lake Idaho geese die, fall from sky
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Mud lake Idaho geese die, fall from sky
Cody Mooney, visiting from Loveland, Colo., tosses his 17-month-old daughter Willow in the air as snow geese take flight behind, Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, in the Skagit Valley near La Conner, Wash. Bird watchers took advantage of a day without rain Thursday to gaze at some of the tens of thousands of snow geese that spend the winter near the mouth of the Skagit River there. The geese migrate from their mating grounds in Alaska and Siberia in late November to spend the winter in wetlands and farm fields of the Skagit Valley and other areas of northwest Washington. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A bird watcher views snow geese in flight over a field Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, in the Skagit Valley near La Conner, Wash. Bird watchers took advantage of a day without rain Thursday to gaze at some of the tens of thousands of snow geese that spend the winter near the mouth of the Skagit River there. The geese migrate from their mating grounds in Alaska and Siberia in late November to spend the winter in wetlands and farm fields of the Skagit Valley and other areas of northwest Washington. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
FILE - In this May 9 2005, file photo, shows snow geese and Canada geese preparing to land on marsh at the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge near Merrill, Ore. Wildlife officials say 2,000 migrating snow geese have died in eastern Idaho likely because of avian cholera. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says staff and volunteers collected the dead birds over the last several days at the Mud Lake Wildlife Management Area near Terreton and the Market Lake Wildlife Management Area near Roberts. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard, File)
Bird watchers view snow geese flying over a field Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, in the Skagit Valley near La Conner, Wash. Bird watchers took advantage of a day without rain Thursday to gaze at some of the tens of thousands of snow geese that spend the winter near the mouth of the Skagit River there. The geese migrate from their mating grounds in Alaska and Siberia in late November to spend the winter in wetlands and farm fields of the Skagit Valley and other areas of northwest Washington. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Adult snow geese and their gray-feathered off-spring forage in a field Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, in the Skagit Valley near La Conner, Wash. Bird watchers took advantage of a day without rain Thursday to gaze at some of the tens of thousands of snow geese that spend the winter near the mouth of the Skagit River there. The geese migrate from their mating grounds in Alaska and Siberia in late November to spend the winter in wetlands and farm fields of the Skagit Valley and other areas of northwest Washington. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Snow geese fly over a field Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, in the Skagit Valley near La Conner, Wash. Bird watchers took advantage of a day without rain Thursday to gaze at some of the tens of thousands of snow geese that spend the winter near the mouth of the Skagit River there. The geese migrate from their mating grounds in Alaska and Siberia in late November to spend the winter in wetlands and farm fields of the Skagit Valley and other areas of northwest Washington. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
FILE- In this Nov. 23, 2009 file photo, thousands of sandhill cranes, snow geese and other migratory birds gather at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge south of Socorro, N.M. Biologists at the refuge are expecting record numbers of migrating birds this year due to severe drought conditions in neighboring Texas. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
Hundreds of snow geese take to the sky as other continue feeding below in the Skagit Valley Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2004, on Fir Island, near Conway, Wash. Thousands of snow geese, with black-tipped wings and a wingspan of about three feet, migrate to the area each winter. The valley hosts one of the largest wintering populations of birds in the lower 48 states. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
In this Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010 photo, more than 8,000 snow and Ross' geese migrate into the Bitterroot Valley near Stevensville, Mont., in front of an arctic storm. The unusual migration can be viewed at Lee Metcalf Wildlife Refuge just north of Stevensville. (AP Photo/Perry Backus)
Snow geese take to the air by the thousands after being disturbed briefly while feeding in the Skagit Valley Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2004, on Fir Island, near Conway, Wash. Thousands of snow geese, with black-tipped wings and a wingspan of about three feet, migrate to the area each winter. The valley hosts one of the largest wintering populations of birds in the lower 48 states. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Snow geese take flight Wednesday, March 12, 1997, over a farm field near Funk Lagoon Waterfowl Production Area near Funk, Neb., where they were feeding. Hundreds of thousands of geese are fattening up on corn before heading north to nest in Arctic regions. (AP Photo/Linda Kahlbaugh)
A pair of snow geese fly past their feeding grounds in the Skagit Valley, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2004, on Fir Island, near Conway, Wash. Thousands of snow geese, with black-tipped wings and a wingspan of about three feet, migrate to the area each winter. The valley hosts one of the largest wintering populations of birds in the lower 48 states. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
In this March 30, 2012 photo, Sandhill cranes fly over the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge near Tulelake, Calif. Standing behind endangered fish and farms in the line for scarce water, the refuge has been able to flood only half its marshes this spring, crowding birds together so they are more likely to catch avian cholera from each other. More than 10,000 birds have died, mostly Ross' geese, snow geese, pintail ducks and coots. The refuge is a major stop for migrating waterfowl on the Pacific Flyway, drawing some 260 species and some 2 million birds. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard)
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