Fallen K9 gets an officer's salute fit for a hero: 'He served valiantly and courageously'

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Police Officers Give Final Salute To K9 Officer Who Died In The Line of Duty

A fallen K9 has gotten an officer's salute fit for a hero after being killed in the line of duty.

Read: Three-Legged U.S. Marine Corps Dog Is Awarded Highest Animal War Medal

On Tuesday afternoon, officers paid their respects to their fallen partner. They formed a line up in the parking lot outside the California hospital where K9 Credo succumbed to his injuries, and saluted as the fallen K9's remains were transported out in a gurney draped in an American flag.

Credo's handler, 23-year Long Beach Police Department veteran Mike Parcells, appeared grief-striken and overcome at the ceremony.

The 4-year-old Belgian Malinois, who worked with patrol and narcotics and was pivotal in more than 30 apprehensions, was shot by friendly fire alongside the suspect.

Credo was transported by squad car to the Signal Hill Pet Hospital, where he died of his injuries.

"These service dogs, these K9s, they're not just dogs. These are police officers," Deputy Chief Richard Conant from the Long Beach Police Department said at a press conference. "This dog was injured in a performance of his duty and that's going to weigh heavily in the Long Beach police family."

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Credo the K9 officer laid to rest in Calif.
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Credo the K9 officer laid to rest in Calif.

Credo the K9 officer at work

(Photo courtesy of INSIDE EDITION)

Credo the K9 officer

(Photo courtesy of INSIDE EDITION)

Officers saying their final farewells to Credo

(Photo courtesy of INSIDE EDITION)

Officers responding to the incident where Credo lost his life

(Photo courtesy of INSIDE EDITION)

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Credo, who has served with the department for two years, will also be given an honorable burial.

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According to a press release, the Long Beach Police Department were called in to join a SWAT team in arresting a male suspect wanted in connection with a 2014 shooting involving multiple victims.

Credo was commanded to stop the suspect from advancing toward officers. The suspect was considered armed and dangerous, and produced a knife as Credo fought him off.

After the suspect refused to back down to intermediate measures including a rubber bullet, an officer then fired his weapon, and both the suspect and Credo were caught in the gunfire.

Aerial footage of the scene captured Officer Parcells slinging the dog over his shoulder, distraught. He carries his partner away from the scene and lays him on the sidewalk, and can be seen throwing off his helmet in frustration.

"[He] served valiently and courageously in the service he rendered to the Long Beach Police department," Long Beach Police Department's Liutenant Ryan LeBaron told InsideEdition.com, "and ultimately gave his life to the service."

The unidentified suspect was also transported to local hospital where he was prononced dead.

Read: Cop Who Left Police Dog in Hot Patrol Car Also Investigated in Fatal Shooting of Previous K9 Partner

A young woman, who NBC4 identified as the suspect's sister, said, "I wouldn't wish death on my brother. I wouldn't wish death on the dog. I wish everything could have been normal."

Credo became Parcells' second K9 partner who was killed in duty. In 2005, K9 Ranger was struck by gunfire during a tactical incident where he was working to apprehend another dangerous suspect, LeBaron told InsideEdition.com.

According to CBS LA, Ranger was killed after officers attempted to expel an armed parolee from underneath a porch.

Related: See police dogs at work:

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Police Dogs learn to thwart attacks
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Police Dogs learn to thwart attacks
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection teams train on the agility course at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Jason Wharton walks with his K-9 partner Mikey, a German Shepherd, as they train outside the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
A Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection dog leaps over an obstacle during agility training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection teams train on the agility course at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police K-9 explosive detection dogs sit on command during agility training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Daniel McCade and his K-9 partner Droga, a Belgian Malinois, work during a simulated bomb search near dedicated MTA busses permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Jason Wharton interacts with his K-9 partner Mikey, a German Shepherd, as they train at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Kevin Pimpinelli works with his K-9 partner Johnny, a German Shepherd, during a simulated bomb search outside a dedicated Metro-North Railroad commuter train car permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Kevin Pimpinelli works with his K-9 partner Johnny, a German Shepherd, during a simulated bomb search aboard a dedicated Metro-North Railroad commuter train car permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Kevin Pimpinelli works with his K-9 partner Johnny, a German Shepherd, during a simulated bomb search aboard a dedicated Metro-North Railroad commuter train car permanently installed for training at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Jason Wharton watches as his K-9 partner in training Mikey, a German Shepherd, indicates he has found an explosive by sitting, inside a training room in the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Keith Flood trains with his K-9 partner Doc, a German Shepherd, inside the "warehouse room" at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) Police Officer Keith Flood trains with his K-9 partner Doc, a German Shepherd, inside the "warehouse room" at the new MTA Police Department Canine Training Center in Stormville, New York, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
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Watch: K9 Gets Stage Fright As He Is Sworn Into Office as Department's First Comfort Dog

K9 Officer Gets Shy While Being Sworn In During Ceremony

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