Study finds more people want to carry guns after Orlando shooting

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Putting the Orlando Attack in Context

A new study has shown that more people want to legally own a firearm in the wake of the Orlando shootings, which left 49 dead and 53 injured. The study, conducted by Washington Post-ABC News, found that 54 percent of responders would support more people legally owning defense weapons, with 42 percent against the notion.

The survey used a random sample of 1,001 adults. White, Republican men who live in a rural or suburban area and do not have a college degree were the group that most valued self-defense, the study showed. Over two-thirds of those surveyed, however, identify as Democrat or Independent.

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After the Orlando shootings, which occurred at the hands of Omar Mateen who used an AR-15 semi-automatic gun, the debate over gun control has been addressed again. A vast majority, 86 percent, of surveyors fear "lone wolf" attacks, but the results were less clear over whether assault riffles themselves should be banned: 51 percent were for a ban.

Despite being on the FBI's watch list, Mateen was able to obtain his gun legally. Most surveyors, 72 percent, encouraged surveillance of people with possible associations to terrorism. Even more, 86 percent, want to ban those on the watch list from being able to purchase a gun.

RELATED: 50,000 people attend Orlando vigil

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50,000 people attend Orlando vigil
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50,000 people attend Orlando vigil
A woman mourns as she sits on the ground and takes part in a vigil for the Pulse night club victims following last week's shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S., June 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
A man cries while his friends comfort him as they take part in a vigil for the Pulse night club victims following last week's shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S., June 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
People take part in a vigil for the Pulse night club victims following last week's shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S., June 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A man holds a rainbow U.S. flag during a vigil for the Pulse night club victims following last weeks shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S., June 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 19: People attend a memorial service on June 19, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. Thousands of people are expected at the evening event which will feature entertainers, speakers and a candle vigil at sunset. In what is being called the worst mass shooting in American history, Omar Mir Seddique Mateen killed 49 people at the popular gay nightclub early last Sunday. Fifty-three people were wounded in the attack which authorities and community leaders are still trying to come to terms with. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 19: People attend a memorial service on June 19, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. Thousands of people are expected at the evening event which will feature entertainers, speakers and a candle vigil at sunset. In what is being called the worst mass shooting in American history, Omar Mir Seddique Mateen killed 49 people at the popular gay nightclub early last Sunday. Fifty-three people were wounded in the attack which authorities and community leaders are still trying to come to terms with. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 19: People wait for the start of a memorial service on June 19, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. Thousands of people are expected at the evening event which will feature entertainers, speakers and a candle vigil at sunset. In what is being called the worst mass shooting in American history, Omar Mir Seddique Mateen killed 49 people at the popular gay nightclub early last Sunday. Fifty-three people were wounded in the attack which authorities and community leaders are still trying to come to terms with. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Supporters of the victims of the recent mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub line the shore of Lake Eola Park during a vigil, Sunday, June 19, 2016, Orlando, Fla. Tens of thousands of people attended the vigil. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Supporters of the victims of the recent mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub hold candles while attending a vigil at Lake Eola Park, Sunday, June 19, 2016, Orlando, Fla. Tens of thousands of people attended the vigil. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Supporters of the victims of the recent mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub attend a vigil at Lake Eola Park, Sunday, June 19, 2016, Orlando, Fla. Tens of thousands of people attended the vigil. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Supporters of the victims of the recent mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub attend a vigil at Lake Eola Park, Sunday, June 19, 2016, Orlando, Fla. Tens of thousands of people attended the vigil. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Supporters of the victims of the recent mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub hold candles while attending a vigil at Lake Eola Park, Sunday, June 19, 2016, Orlando, Fla. Tens of thousands of people attended the vigil. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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GOP candidate Donald Trump has called for a temporary ban on Muslims; the notion was first brought up after the Paris terrorist attacks in November. Forty-three percent of participants supported said ban. Half of the participants, however, said they trusted Clinton to handle terrorism more than Trump.

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